Archives mensuelles : mai 2014

Sophie Langohr, Glorious Bodies, les images (2)

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr

Saint Philippe par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Olivier Langendries par Max Zambelli pour Boglioli, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (55 x 40 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Saint Paul par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Spyros Christopoulos, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, (38 x 32) et (38 x 27 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Saint Jude par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Jeff Bridges par Mario Sorrenti, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (100 x 75 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Saint Jacques majeur par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Julien Doré par Yann Rabanier, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (57 x 46 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr

Saint Barthélemy par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Mariano Ontanon par Mert&Marcus pour Givenchy, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (45 x 33 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr

Saint Matthieu par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Dimitris Alexandrou par Errikos Andreou, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (33 x 45cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Jésus par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Justin Passmore par Kai Z Feng pour Horst Magazine, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (52 x 41 cm), 2013 -2014.

 

Sophie Langohr, Glorious bodies, les images (1)

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Saint André par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme un sans abri par Lee Jeffries, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, (33 x 33) et (33 x 31cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Saint Jacques le mineur par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Aiden Shaw par Kalle Gustafsson pour Uniforms for the dedicated , de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (80 x 53 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Saint Simon par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Jeremy Irons par Michaël Muller, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, (26 x 17) et (26 x 18 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Saint Pierre par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Philippe Crangi pour Giles&Brother, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (60 x 45 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Saint Mathias par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Ricky Hall, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (55 x 44 cm), 2013 -2014.

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Saint Jean par Gérémie Geisselbrunn (1595 – 1660) photographié comme Gaspard Ulliel par Martin Scorcèse pour Chanel, de la série Glorious Bodies, photographies noir et blanc marouflées sur aluminium, 2 x (37 x 52 cm), 2013 -2014.

Valérie Sonnier, Skoteinos, Das Dunkle, Worldroom 42, Münich, les images

Valérie Sonnier

Valérie Sonnier

Skoteinos, Das Dunkle, Worldroom 42, Münich, 12 avril – 1er mai 2014.

Aglaia Konrad, Das Haus (ausgestellt), Netwerk, Aalst

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad

Press release :

The oeuvre of the Brussels-based artist Aglaia Konrad (°1960 Salzburg) – comprising photos, films, spatial installations and publications – is characterised by a patent love of architecture. Fuelled by her fascination for the way models and ideas come to be materialised in the constructed world, she conducts her own unconventional visual research into the observation and experience of architecture. 
Her new film, Das Haus, is a key work in a greater installation that, typically of her approach, has been designed specifically for the exhibition space. This work fits into her series of 16mm films, Concrete & Samples, in which Konrad investigates the sculptural potential of architecture and visualises the sublime and sensual experience of observing it. Das Haus was filmed in and around the Van Wassenhove house in Sint-Martens-Latem – an idiosyncratic, modernist design from 1974 by architect Juliaan Lampens. After the owner recently passed away, the house was gifted to the Department of Architecture & Urban Planning at the University of Ghent, which will be responsible for the further use and management of the former residential home. This transitional moment in the building’s history provides the ideal context for the filming of this unconventional house.

The specific qualities of the medium of film, and in particular the materiality and tactility of 16mm film, allow for the visualisation of the complex interplay of materiality, light, rhythm and movement. The lack of an established formula for an experience-based approach to the visual representation of architecture affords each new work by Konrad a new intensity and tension. The effect of this is constructive, given that the physical architecture in this case forms the unique schematic for the filming process. The compositions are determined by decoding the elements contained by this schematic: the floor plan, use of materials, of light, form, rhythm, etc. The compositions are always influenced by the movement of the recordings and the passing of time, the context and the current status of the building. As a result of this, the outcome of the work cannot be determined or predicted beforehand, which makes this an especially challenging way
of working.

An intensive period of on-location research and exploration precedes the actual filming. This is a fundamental phase of concentrated ‘thinking-by-looking’ in which the schematic is studied by the artist. The stylistic choice to use 16mm film is also part of this. The medium must be used economically, which further focuses the artist’s consideration of the experience of observation and the mental pre-selection of images.

Other conscious decisions include the omission of sound and the choice not to include any human presence in the film. This has the effect of making the architecture itself the sole protagonist. The lack of any distracting elements allows the immutable material of the architecture to act and move like a living character. The characterful Van Wassenhove house is notable for its striking concrete forms and its open-plan interior landscape spanning two levels. In the filmic representation of the observational experience we are presented with an extremely intimate picture of the radical choices and poetic gestures made by the architect. The boundless play of natural light and the use of materials in the building is strongly accentuated and brought into the exhibition space. The seating and the cylindrical forms that make up the spatial installation refer graciously to the creations of Juliaan Lampens and their sculptural potential.

Das Haus was produced by August Orts, in cooperation with Courtisane and with additional support from VAF, Netwerk / centre for contemporary art, UGent (Dept. of Architecture & Urban Planning, Dept. of Communication, Dept. of Services), LUCA Sint-Lukas Brussel, Juliaan Lampens Foundation, Fotohof Salzburg and the Province of East Flanders.

The scenography of the presentation was designed by the artist in collaboration with the architect Kris Kimpe.

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad

L’œuvre de l’artiste Aglaia Konrad (°1960 Salzbourg), installée à Bruxelles, comprend photos, films, installations spatiales et publications, et manifeste son amour de l’architecture. Fascinée par la façon dont les modèles et les idées se matérialisent dans le monde bâti, elle mène une recherche visuelle peu conventionnelle sur l’observation et l’expérience de l’architecture.
Son nouveau film, Das Haus, est l’œuvre clé d’une installation plus vaste qui, comme c’est souvent le cas chez Konrad, a été conçue spécialement pour l’espace d’exposition. Ce travail s’insère dans une série de films 16mm, Concrete & Samples, dans laquelle l’artiste explore le potentiel sculptural de l’architecture et se met en quête de formes susceptibles de rendre le sublime et l’expérience sensuelle de l’observation de celle-ci. Das Haus a été filmé autour et à l’intérieur de la maison Van Wassenhove à Sint-Martens-Latem – un cas particulier de l’architecture moderniste imaginé par Juliaan Lampens en 1974. Peu après la mort récente du propriétaire, la maison a été léguée au Département de l’Architecture et de l’Urbanisme de l’Université de Gand, désormais responsable de cette ancienne villa résidentielle. Ce moment de transition dans l’histoire du bâtiment fournit un contexte idéal pour filmer cette demeure inhabituelle.

Les qualités spécifiques du médium filmique, et en particulier la matérialité, la tactilité du film 16mm, permettent de rendre compte d’une interaction complexe de la matière, de la lumière, du rythme et du mouvement. Rares sont les représentations visuelles de l’architecture fondées sur son expérience sensible, ce qui donne au travail de Konrad une intensité particulière ; c’est en effet sur l’architecture physique que repose l’unique schéma du processus filmique. Les cadrages sont déterminés par le décodage des éléments contenus dans ce schéma : le plan d’architecture, l’utilisation des matériaux, la lumière, la forme, le rythme, etc. Ils sont influencés par les mouvements de la caméra, mais aussi par le passage du temps, par le contexte et le statut actuel du bâtiment. Le résultat ne peut jamais être prévu ou déterminé à l’avance, ce qui rend la façon de travailler particulièrement audacieuse.

La réalisation est précédée d’une période intense de recherche et d’exploration sur place, phase fondamentale dans une « pensée par observation » où le schéma de réalisation est longuement médité par l’artiste. Le choix stylistique du film 16mm participe de cette éthique de travail : le médium doit être utilisé avec économie, ce qui impose la pré-sélection mentale des images et une extrême concentration sur l’expérience de l’observation. La suppression du son et le choix de n’inclure aucune présence humaine sont d’autres décisions conscientes, qui font de l’architecture le seul protagoniste. Tout élément distracteur est évité, seule la matière immuable agit et se meut, tel un personnage vivant. La maison de Van Wassenhove surprend par ses étonnantes formes concrètes et par son paysage intérieur, ouvert sur deux niveaux. L’expérience d’observation rendue possible par le film rend visibles les choix radicaux et les gestes poétiques de l’architecte. Le jeu sans limites de la lumière naturelle et l’utilisation des matériaux se trouvent accentués dans l’espace d’exposition : les sièges ainsi que les formes cylindriques qui structurent l’installation spatiale font gracieusement référence au potentiel sculptural des créations de Juliaan Lampens.

Le film a été co-produit par Auguste Orts et Courtisane, avec le soutien de VAF, Netwerk/Centre d’Art Contemporain, l’Université de Gand (département de l’Architecture et de l’Urbanisme, département des Communications, département des Services), LUCA Sint-Lukas Brussels, la Fondation Juliaan Lampens, Fotohof Salzbourg et la Province de Flandre orientale.

La scénographie est l’œuvre de l’artiste, en collaboration avec l’architecte Kris Kimpe.

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad

John Murphy, Such are the vanished coconuts of hidden Africa, revue de presse (2)

Lu dans le supplément Art de La Libre, ce vendredi 23 mai. Par Claude Lorent

La Libre

John Murphy, Such are the vanished coconuts of hidden Africa, les images (4)

John Murphy

John Murphy

John Murphy

E la nave va (The Joseph Conrad serie), 2003
Etching on offset and serigraphy (text), 85 x 101 cm. Ed. of 2.

John Murphy

John Murphy

Humanity’s Echo, The Parrot is Dead, 1998
Music partition, pen and ink, Stuffed Parrot. Variable dimensions

John Murphy, Such are the vanished coconuts of hidden Africa, les images (3)

John Murphy

John Murphy

…(Vela), 2002-2003.
oil on canvas, in two parts, (2) x 230 x 169 x 3 cm

John Murphy

John Murphy

On the Way… Are you dressed in the map of your travels ?, 2003
Stuffed parrot, post card and stand. Parrot: 24 x 32 x 23 cm. Stand: 83 x 73x 3,5 cm Framed postcard: 86,5 x 74,5 x 3,5 cm.

John Murphy

Movement of the internal being (The Joseph Conrad serie), 2003
Etching on offset and serigraphy (text), 85 x 101 cm. Ed. of 2.

 

Jacques Charlier, Himmelsweg, Glorious Bodies, IKOB Eupen (2)

Jacques Charlier

The beauty of the devil

(…) Jacques Charlier appeals to yet another mystic, and not one of the least important, Teresa of Avila, when he installs “Himmelsweg” (1987) in Pierreuse in Liège, in the Chapelle Saint-Roch in 1991. A passage written by Therese of Avila catches his attention: “All the books say about the agony and various tortures the demons subject upon the damned, all this is nothing compared to reality: there is between the one and the other the same difference as between an inanimate portrait and a living person, and to burn in this world is nothing in comparison to the fire in which we burn in the other.” “Himmelsweg”, the road to paradise, evokes the resurrection of the flesh, sin, hell, the genius of evil and his deceptive schemes, like the tunnel of death of the Nazi extermination camps. These give the ramp made of sticks and barbed wire that leads to the door of the gas chambers the name Himmelsweg.

Ah, the image of the Evil One can be so appealing! Jacques Charlier revives a major work of romantic sculpture, the two versions of “Triomphe de la Religion sur le Génie du Mal” (Triumph of Religion over the Genius of Evil), one by Joseph Geefs, the other by his brother Guillaume, the first kept in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Brussels, the other sitting at the foot of the ornate gothic pulpit of St. Paul’s Cathedral in Liège, in the very place where we should find … the first. Yes, but guess what: the fallen angel sculpted by Joseph Geefs was considered too sublime. “Joseph portrays a youthful dreamer who, with a broken sceptre, crown held in a weary hand, seduces by his ambiguous beauty, » writes Jacques Van Lennep to whom we owe a fascinating study on the subject. Apart from the wings of a bat, it is a man of great classic beauty, almost naked, a drape covering the groin; his form following a serpentine curve. He is young, smooth and graceful, almost androgynous. Even the snake at his feet seems to languish. The parishioners will not remain unmoved by this sculpture which looks more like Adonis than Lucifer, and which will apparently also inspire an unusual devotion and popular fervour. Faced with this much carnal intensity, the Fabrique d’église (Church Council) will commission a second version of the Genius of Evil, this time from Guillaume Geefs. The latter will represent the angel of darkness a little less bare, hips draped and covered, closer to the satanic iconography, horned so as to dehumanize him, at his feet the Apple of the Fall, consumed since marked with a bite. Chained and therefore more Promethean than his predecessor, his face contorted, Lucifer protects his head from divine punishment, which of course, is more consistent with the original order and reassures the clergy.

In Jacques Charlier’s installation, the framed photograph of the sculpture of William Geefs hangs above a small pedestal table draped in black. Chains are arranged on the bottom shelf. On the table, there are three books: a Carmelite study on Satan, an old science book on Air and the Memorial of Belgian Jews exterminated at Auschwitz. This is the reality of the genius of evil; and the greatest mistake would be to forget.
It is obviously not insignificant that Charlier would place a Carmelite study among the three books on the table. In fact, he creates this work while the controversy known as the Auschwitz Cross (1984-1993) fully rages – the installation of a congregation of Carmelites in the extermination camp, the starting point of a serious crisis that quickly transcended the religious conflict to embed itself within the very fabric of Polish and world history.

Appropriation of memory, instrumentalisation of images, “Auschwitz”, in the words of Annette Wieviorka, “has increasingly become disconnected from the history it produced”. Some realize that the saturation of memory threatens the very effectiveness of memory, and that it is difficult to know what it takes to desaturate memory by something other than forgetting. How then shall memory be reinvented, a working memory, a memory that is not a mere result, knowing that forgetting causes the eternally repeated fall. (…)

Jacques Charlier

Le Merveilleux et la périphérie, Chapelle St-Roch, Liège 1991.

Jacques Charlier

Himmelseg, chemins de paradis, Maastricht 2008

John Murphy, Such are the vanished coconuts of hidden Africa, les images (2)

John Murphy

John Murphy

John Murphy

John Murphy
Sunk into solitude, 2013
Photo work, 239 x 179,5 cm.

John Murphy

John Murphy

John Murphy
Sunk into Solitude, 2003
Envelop addressed to the artist, postmark and stamp, 86,5 x 74,5 x 3,5 cm.

John Murphy, Such are the vanished coconuts of hidden Africa, revue de presse

Lu dans H.ART l’article de Colette Dubois

H.ART

John Murphy : Voyage dans l’espace entre mot et image

La première exposition de John Murphy (°1945), un artiste britannique majeur, à la galerie Nadja Vilenne s’intitule ‘Such are the Vanished Coconuts of Hidden Africa’. Les peintures, les gravures, les installations, les très petits et les très grands formats, les oeuvres très récentes ou plus anciennes forment une nouvelle constellation toute entière axée sur l’idée du voyage conçu comme un défrichement d’espaces inconnus, souvent nichés au coeur de chaque être.

Colette DUBOIS

Le travail de Murphy est constitué d’emprunts utilisés à la manière des ready-mades (cartes postales, affichettes, objets) ou transformés (recadrés, modifiés dans le format, le support ou le médium ). A ces éléments trouvés, l’artiste associe un fragment de texte ; ces quelques mots, souvent partie de l’oeuvre, en deviennent le titre. Ils produisent un jeu dialectique dans lequel l’association, l’intervalle et l’ellipse – trois opérations typiquement cinématographiques et plus particulièrement liées au montage – ont un rôle primordial. Ce qui se passe dans l’entre-deux de l’image et des mots – cette zone spatiale et temporelle où se crée le sens – est précisément ce qui intéresse l’artiste.
L’intervalle, comme l’ont remarqué les cinéastes Dziga Vertov et Jean-Luc Godard ou encore le philosophe Gilles Deleuze, est une affirmation du présent, celui du regardeur tout autant que celui du créateur. C’est donc d’un présent variable qu’il s’agit et qui est toujours à rejouer dans le moment du regard ; le temps – un temps anachronique et toujours renouvelé – devient un matériau formel au même titre que l’image, le papier ou la toile. Chez Murphy, ces intervalles entre mots et image sont présents dans chaque pièce et ils se multiplient dans le rapport entre les différents travaux de l’exposition. En effet, l’artiste envisage chaque présentation comme une nouvelle configuration des oeuvres qui deviennent alors chacune le fragment d’une nouvelle constellation : tout se passe entre l’image et son titre, la relation aux autres images/titres dans un espace qui devient oeuvre à son tour.

‘Such are the Vanished Coconuts of Hidden Africa’ s’organise comme une suite logique à ‘Of Voyage, Of Other Places’, une exposition dans laquelle les pièces de Murphy s’imbriquaient dans celles de la collection du Musée de Trondheim (Norvège). Les deux oeuvres nouvelles, de très grande taille, représentent un rhinocéros, elles sont présentées face à face. Les images, recadrées verticalement, ‘sortent’ du film de Federico Fellini ‘E la nave va’. Dans l’une, le pachyderme se laisse emporter dans une barque (‘Sunk into solitude’), dans l’autre, il est soulevé par des cordes (‘E la nave va’). En contrepoint affirmé, la grande peinture intitulée ‘The Deceptive Caress of a Giraffe’ ne laisse voir que les seules oreilles de l’animal ; en contrepoint discret, une enveloppe adressée à l’artiste porte un timbre représentant deux rhinocéros. Les ellipses, la fragmentation, les recadrages répondent à la puissance poétique des titres. Mais la propriété singulière des éléments empruntés consiste aussi à transporter avec elles tout ce qui appartient à leur source. Ainsi, les deux eaux-fortes représentant le trois-mâts ‘Joseph Conrad’ réfère évidement à un des plus importants écrivains anglais du 20ème siècle, mais aussi à sa qualité marin et sans doute à son roman, ‘Au coeur des ténèbres’, l’odyssée d’une lente remontée du fleuve Congo de la civilisation à la plongée dans une nature dense et inquiétante. La toile ‘…(Vela)’ renvoie à la constellation homonyme, partie de l’immense constellation du ‘Navire Argo’, lequel, dans la mythologie grecque, emportait Jason et ses compagnons à la recherche de la Toison d’or…
Cette remarquable exposition de John Murphy nous invite à voyager dans les intervalles qu’il ouvre pour nous, c’est-à-dire aussi en nous-mêmes.