Archives mensuelles : mai 2016

Loop Fair Barcelona 2016, Charlotte Lagro, The Day the Clown Cried, videostills & installation

The video diptych The Day the Clown Cried explores the power of performative arts in dealing with the legacy of WWII through three post-war generations. We follow Dönci Bánki, a mime artist of Hungarian Jewish descent as he visits Auschwitz-Birkenau in Poland. The video features a series of dances by Bánki on-site that are combined with rare fragments of the filming of The Day the Clown Cried, 1972, forming a parallel world to the mime artist in Auschwitz in the present day. The Day the Clown Cried is a movie by American comedian Jerry Lewis about a clown who is sent to a concentration camp. Considered too distasteful by art critics, Lewis decided never to release the film. In a second video we see Elise and Clémentine perform frail songs on the Ukulele, interceded with fragments of playing schoolchildren on-site. They face the ‘Citadel’, a military fortress which was used by the American military to imprison Gestapo agents after the fall of Liège in 1944.

1.

clown001

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro
The Day the Clown Cried, 2015
Double channel, loop, HD video, colour, sound.
1.The Day the Clown Cried. 00:10.40

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro
The Day the Clown Cried, 2015
Double channel, loop, HD video, colour, sound
2.Elise et Clémentine, 00:07:09

3.

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Fête de la Gestapo (2015)
Drawing on archival photo from 1944 in Liège, Belgium. 2015, 80 x 80 cm.

‘Fête de la Gestapo’ shows an 80 x 80 cm printed photograph of Gestapo agents captured in a cell in the Citadel of Liège (military fortification) in 1944, right after the fall of Liège. The photocopy is overdrawn by four girls (aged 6 to 14 years), transforming the desillusioned agents into clownlike figures.Their drawing reflects the clowns in the video ‘The Day The Clown Cried’.

Exhibition’s views at Résidences Artistiques Internationales Vivegnis (RAVi), Liège, 2015

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Pol Pierart, Day for Night, collection d’Antoine de Galbert, SHED, Rouen, Malheur – Bonheur

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

 

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart
Le bonheur, le malheur, 2001 (Film 14)
Film super 8 numérisé, couleurs, sans son, 00:06:48

De muets instantanés, un film cousu de petites choses décousues : le malheur et le bonheur annoncés par l’auteur sur deux cartons face caméra. Défilent ainsi les images d’un couple assis sur un banc de jardin entouré de potirons et autres cucurbitacées, d’un pèse lettre posé devant un rideau flottant au gré du vent, d’une promenade dans un chemin creux, près d’un ancien fort, d’une chute, celle littérale du caméraman. Un singulier cagoulard, présente à la caméra une série de cartons successifs. J’ai deux nouvelles, une bonne et une mauvaise, lit-on. Je commence par la bonne. Vous allez mourir. La mauvaise maintenant. Pas tout de suite. Deux pieds masculins cachent le centre d’une inscription tracée sur le plancher, tandis que passent deux jambes féminines gainées de nylon. Celles-ci sortent du champ ; l’homme disparait du côté opposé ; ses pieds dévoilent le mot désunir. Au mur, c’est Etre et s’empêtre qui se conjuguent. Travelling sur des haies tracées aux cordeaux sur des pavillons qui abritent autant de bonheurs conformes ; les gazons sont entretenus, les pavés rigoureusement appareillés. Ce sont des images comme on aimerait en voir tous les jours. Comme, peut-être, celles de ce vent d’été glissant dans un rideau de porte, celles de ces passants entraperçus par la fenêtre, celle de cet homme qui repeint sa clôture. Le bonheur pour tout le monde. Une allée de verdure s’étire entre deux haies. Ce qui nous manque ce n’est pas de jouir. Mais de bander, lit-on sur deux cartons successifs. Quant aux nains de jardins, aux boîtes aux lettres les plus kitsch que fixe enfin la caméra, ce sont des emerdveillements. Gros plan final sur le même couple assis sur le même banc de jardin. Ils ont l’air de s’emmerder.

Jacques Lizène, Fourniture, Sculpture, centre d’art Hugo Voet, Herentaels

Jacques Lizène participe à l’exposition Sculpture Fourniture au Centre d’art Hugo Voet à Herentaels.

Avec des oeuvres de:

Nel Aerts, Atelier Pica Pica, Hans Demeulenaere, Stefaan Dheedene, Pieter Engels, gerlach en koop, Vedran Kopljar, Jacques Lizène, Erwan Mahéo, pelican avenue, Helgi Thorsson, Dennis Tyfus, Michael Van den Abeele, Herman Van Ingelgem, Elise Van Mourik, Frederik Van Simaey, Henk Visch, Leen Voet, Franz West

08.05.2016 – 02.07.2016
Art center Hugo Voeten
23, Vennen
2200 Herentals

Jacques Lizène

Jacques Lizène

Jacques Lizène,
Art syncrétique, chaises croisées, en remake, 2009
Technique mixte
Collection Muhka Anvers

photos Isabelle Arthuis

Charlotte Lagro, The Day the Clown Cried, press release

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

The Day the Clown Cried, a diptych by Charlotte Lagro

Loop Barelona“Jerry Lewis’ The Day the Clown Cried, writes Jean-Michel Frodon 1, is a dream movie, a nightmare movie to be more precise. It tells the story of a German clown, Helmut Doork, played by Jerry Lewis, who ends up accompanying Jewish children into a gas chamber at Auschwitz. It is a movie that is all about laughter, continues Frodon, what it is to make people laugh, to be funny, to be professionally funny: a subject which Joseph Levitch, better known as Jerry Lewis, was quite familiar with in 1971 when he embarked upon this project, after a more than 30 year-long career as a stand-up comedian, actor and comic director.”

The Day the Clown Cried indeed occupies a unique place in the filmography of the Holocaust. Going beyond the initial concept of screenwriters Joan O’Brien and Charles Denton, who initially wanted to write a film about the Holocaust with a clown as main character, Jerry Lewis wanted to turn this film into a “paradoxical meditation on comedy, spectacle … and himself.”
Helmut, played by Lewis, is a German clown, a total disgrace of a man, who is fired from the circus he works for. During a night of heavy drinking, not for any ideological reasons but out of spite, he spits on a portrait of Hitler, for which he is sent to a political prison camp. Helmut, whose desire to make people laugh at every opportunity has always been irrepressible, wallows in his shamed dignity and contemptuously refuses to entertain his fellow prisoners. Before long, however, he accepts to perform – at the request of SS officers and mainly because he thinks he can gain personal advantage – for Jewish children held in the neighbouring camp. The avowed aim is to keep them quiet until they suffer the fate to which they are destined. “Helmut , writes Frolon, becomes their guardian and even their shepherd, a shepherd who will accompany his flock into death. At the last moment he decides to stay with the children and enters the gas chamber with them, leading them like the Pied Piper of Hamelin, with the essential difference that he choses to die with them.”
Jerry Lewis wanted to make a film about the “possible manipulation of laughter, or more broadly of the spectacle, by any power – not only by those who rule by terror.” However, for a variety of reasons, the film was never made: there are many disagreements between the producer, writers and Lewis himself, the project runs into budgetary difficulties, and the film rolls are seized by creditors. All the while, a hostile campaign is conducted against film, even before its release in the United States.
The real and fundamental reasons are obviously different, believes Frolon: “The Day the Clown Cried” does not conform to what is considered to be a “Holocaust movie”, namely both serious and sentimental, nor to what we consider to be a Jerry Lewis movie, a funny movie. A dissonant tone that would probably have been its ultimate strength.

Since 2013, an excerpt from a television programme has been circulating about the film and the filming in Paris of the first scenes of the scenario (in which have participated several French actors, performing for free in tribute to the great comic, including Pierre Etaix in the role of the new star clown who supplants Helmut). These images, now posted on the Internet, have stirred Charlotte Lagro’s imagination; they will become the basis for a project which the videographer has given the same title of Jerry Lewis’ unfinished film, a film, or rather a diptych, that evokes, through three generations, all the power of the performing arts in the face of the barbaric legacy of the Holocaust, in the face of the unspeakable.
As such, Charlotte Lagro proposes the mime Dönci Bánki, choreographer and director of Hungarian and Jewish origin, to film him at the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in Poland. In this way, she organizes the return of the clown in Auschwitz and he, solitary, without any witnesses in or around the camp. Here, he will dance, like an ephemeral black shadow in the white snow, or evoke through his contortions the relentless mechanics of bodies. Outside by day, his gestures dialogue with the birch trees along the camp, the Birkenwald, the birch forest that gave Birkenau its name. “The term refers to the meadow where the birch trees grow, so it is a word for a place as such, writes Georges Didi-Huberman. But it could also be – already – a word for pain itself (…) The exclamation au!, in German, corresponds with the spontaneous expression of pain.” Dönci Bánki dances among the trees and – again, I quote Georges Didi-Huberman –, “these tree trunks are already like the bars of a vast prison, or rather like the wire mesh of a harrowing trap » 2.
Dönci Bánki’s performance is like a marriage of shadows. Indoors by night, it is transformed in mechanical and painful, burlesque contortions. Sporting a bowl that functions as a helmet, but also as a mask, he wanders amongst the demons that accompany him, his movements are those of the inarticulate and fatal, he is mechanical and primal, a puppet of the theatrum mundi, both executioner and victim. In this way, grotesquely helmeted or masked, Dönci Bánki revives the spirit of the Dada performance, which we can imagine being witnessed in Zurich while the din of the world and the First World War already rumbles in the background.
To these performative fragments, the alternating day and night, Charlotte Lagro adds very little. Two or three shots suffice to identify the location, the railway tracks that lead to death – Dönci Bánki dances in between them as if it were an ultimate conjuration – the entry gate of the camp, barracks looming in the night. Two or three others are additional shots derived from the Jerry Lewis film.
A makeup scene, a close-up of the face of the clown, a few gestures from a performance, a classic in the genre, the clown trying to light a cigarette in the flame of a candle that goes out whenever he comes close. I think of these words spoken by Reverend Keltner, the cellmate of Helmut the clown:
“When terror reigns, a burst of laughter is the scariest sound of all”. 3
This film by Charlotte Lagro could stand on its own. The videographer, however, decided to make it the first part of a diptych. At Auschwitz, she filmed during winter, in Liege, in Belgium, she will film in summer, on the occasion of a residence in an art centre in the Meuse city. She films carefree children playing, strollers who walk at the foot of the hills. And most of all, she films Elise and Clementine, two girls who play Ukulele, who sing, alone or together, that the Lion is dead tonight, the song by Henri Salvador, with its gazelle and its deep jungle, and other children’s songs as well.
The two girls appear on a terrace, a gazebo, with a panoramic view of the city. Below, there is a railway, passing trains; the rumbling sometimes drowns out their melodies. They are on the hillside and above them there is the Citadel of Liege, with its execution yard, its Block 24 where under the occupation members of the resistance and patriots were locked up before their execution or deportation to the death camps, and where in turn the occupants, the unpatriotic and collaborators were detained during the liberation in September 1944. Both films mirror, complement, confront each other. Charlotte Lagro chose simultaneity over succession. The gaze, then, glides from one screen to another, from winter to summer, from day to night, from the railway of death to the one of life, from the performance of Dönci Bánki to that of Elise and her girlfriend Clementine, from the Auschwitz birch trees to the hills of Liège, from horrible silence to the carefree children’s voices, from one time to another, lead us into the present. Projected in a loop, the two films do not run synchronously.
In this way, the succession of loops multiplies the gliding gazes, while the soundtracks interact continuously; the composition by Jos Neto supports the performance by Dönci Bánki, the children’s songs and the rolling trains.

Elise and Clementine are old enough to go see clowns. In Liège, the circus stops regularly on the public square, close to their terrace and the hillsides of the Citadel. During her residency, Charlotte Lagro discovered in the archives a photo taken during the Liberation, the haggard faces of German prisoners and Gestapo detained at the Citadel. She has given enlargements of this picture to Elise, Clementine and a few of their girlfriends. And they have transformed them, disguised them with their colour crayons. In clowns under rainbows.

1 Jean-Michel Frodon, Le jour de Jerry et la nuit, in Traffic n°92, February 2014
2 Georges Didi-Huberman, Ecorces, Les Editions de Minuit, 2011
3 the scenario of the Jerry Lewis film is available at:
http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/the_day_the_clown_cried.html

Loop Fair Barcelona 2016, Charlotte Lagro, The Day the Clown Cried, une introduction

Charlotte Lagro,
The Day the Clown Cried, 2015
Double channel, loop, HD video, colour, sound.10 min 40 s

THE DAY THE CLOWN CRIED, UN DIPTYQUE DE CHARLOTTE LAGRO

« The Day the Clown Cried de Jerry Lewis, écrit Jean-Michel Frodon1, est un film songe, un film cauchemar pour être plus précis. Il conte l’histoire d’un clown allemand, Helmut Doork, interprété par Jerry Lewis, qui finit par accompagner des enfants juifs dans une chambre à gaz à Auschwitz. C’est un film dont l’enjeu est le rire, continue Frodon, ce que c’est que faire rire, être drôle, faire profession d’être drôle: un sujet sur lequel Joseph Levitch, mieux connu sous le nom de Jerry Lewis, possédait quelques connaissances en 1971 quand il s’est lancé dans ce projet, après plus de 30 ans de carrière comme stand-up comedian, acteur et réalisateur comique. »

The Day the Clown Cried occupe, en effet, une place singulière dans la filmographie qui concerne l’Holocauste. Dépassant le propos des scénaristes Joan O’Brien et Charles Denton, qui se proposaient d’écrire un film sur la Shoah avec un clown comme personnage principal, Jerry Lewis a voulu faire de ce film une « méditation paradoxale sur la comédie, le spectacle… et sur lui-même ». Helmut qu’incarne Lewis est un clown allemand, en totale disgrâce, viré du cirque qui l’emploie. Un soir de beuverie, bien loin de toutes raisons idéologiques, de dépit, il crache sur un portrait d’Hitler, raison pour laquelle on l’enferme dans un camp de prisonniers politiques. Helmut dont pourtant le désir de faire rire en toute occasion a toujours été irrépressible, s’y drape dans une dignité déchue et refuse avec mépris de divertir ses compagnons de détention, avant d’accepter, parce qu’il pense pouvoir en tirer un bénéfice personnel, de se produire à la demande des officiers SS, pour les enfants juifs parqués dans le camp voisin. Le but avoué est de tenir ceux-ci tranquilles jusqu’à ce qu’ils subissent le destin fatal auquel ils sont promis. « Helmut, écrit Frolon, devient ainsi leur gardien et même leur berger, un berger qui va accompagner son troupeau jusqu’à la mort. Au dernier moment, il décide de rester avec les enfants et d’entrer avec eux dans la chambre à gaz, les conduisant tel le joueur de flûte de Hamelin, mais avec cette différence essentielle qu’il choisit de mourir avec eux. »

Jerry Lewis voulait faire un film sur « l’instrumentalisation possible du rire, ou plus largement du spectacle par n’importe quel pouvoir, pas seulement par ceux qui règnent par la terreur ». Pour de multiples raisons, le film toutefois n’existera jamais : les désaccords entre producteur, scénaristes et Lewis lui-même sont nombreux, le projet rencontre des difficultés budgétaires, la pellicule est saisie par les créanciers, tandis qu’est menée une campagne hostile au film, avant même sa sortie aux Etats Unis. Les véritables et fondamentales raisons sont évidemment ailleurs, estime Frolon : « Le jour où le clown pleura » ne répond ni à ce qu’on considère que doit être un « Holocaust movie », sérieux et sentimental à la fois, ni à ce qu’on considère que doit être un film de Jerry Lewis, un film drôle. Une tonalité dissonante qui sans doute en aurait fait toute sa force.

Depuis 2013 circule un extrait d’une émission de télévision consacrée au film et au tournage à Paris des scènes du début du scénario (auxquelles ont participé plusieurs acteurs français, gratuitement en hommage au grand comique, notamment Pierre Etaix dans le rôle du nouveau clown vedette ayant supplanté Helmut). Ces images, aujourd’hui diffusées sur internet ont frappé l’imaginaire de Charlotte Lagro ; elles seront à la base d’un projet auquel la vidéaste donne le titre même du film inachevé de Jerry Lewis, un film, ou plutôt un diptyque évoquant, au travers de trois générations, toute la force des arts performatifs face à l’héritage barbare de l’Holocauste, face à l’innommable. Charlotte Lagro propose dès lors au mime Dönci Bánki, chorégraphe et metteur en scène d’origine hongroise et juive, de le filmer sur les lieux même du camp de concentration d’Auschwitz-Birkenau en Pologne. Ainsi organise-t-elle le retour du clown à Auschwitz et celui-ci, solitaire, sans témoin dans l’enceinte du camp ou à ses abords, tantôt y danse, aérienne ombre noire dans la neige blanche, tantôt évoque par ses contorsions une implacable mécanique des corps. En extérieur jour, sa geste dialogue avec les arbres des bois de bouleaux qui jouxtent le camp, le Birkenwald, le bois de bouleaux qui donna son nom à Birkenau. « La terminaison au désigne exactement la prairie où poussent les bouleaux, c’est donc un mot pour un lieu en tant que tel, écrit Georges Didi-Huberman. Mais ce serait aussi –déjà – un mot pour la douleur elle-même (…) L’exclamation au!, en allemand, correspond au marquage le plus spontané de la douleur ». Dönci Bánki danse parmi les arbres et, – je cite encore Georges Didi-Huberman -, « ces troncs d’arbres sont déjà comme les barreaux d’une immense prison, où plutôt comme les mailles d’un piège obsidional »2. La performance de Dönci Bánki agit comme épousailles des ombres. En intérieur nuit, elle se transforme en burlesques contorsions mécaniques et douloureuses. Coiffé d’un récipient qui lui tient de casque, mais aussi de masque, il erre parmi les démons qui l’accompagnent, ses mouvements sont ceux de l’inarticulé et du fatal, il est mécanique et primal, marionnette du theatrum mundi, bourreau et victime à la fois. Ainsi grotesquement casqué ou masqué Dönci Bánki renoue avec l’esprit de la performance Dada, telle qu’on l’imagine vécue à Zurich alors que gronde déjà le fracas du monde et du premier conflit mondial.

A ces fragments performatifs, alternance des jours et des nuits, Charlotte Lagro n’ajoute que peu de choses. Deux ou trois plans suffisent à identifier les lieux, les voies de chemin de fer qui mènent à la mort – Dönci Bánki danse entre elles comme s’il s’agissait d’une ultime conjuration – , la grille d’entrée du camp, un baraquement surgissant dans la nuit. Deux ou trois autres sont des plans additionnels qui proviennent du film de Jerry Lewis lui-même. Une scène de maquillage, un gros plan sur le visage du clown, quelques gestes de performance, un classique du genre, le clown tentant d’allumer un cigarette à la flamme d’une bougie qui s’éteint à chaque fois qu’il s’en approche. Je repense à ces paroles prononcées par le révérend Keltner, compagnon de cellule d’Helmut le clown : « Quand la terreur règne, un éclat de rire est le plus effrayant de tous les sons ».3

Ce film de Charlotte Lagro aurait pu fonctionner seul. La vidéaste a pourtant décidé d’en faire le premier volet d’un diptyque. A Auschwitz, elle a filmé durant l’hiver, à Liège, en Belgique, elle tournera durant l’été, à l’occasion d’une résidence dans un centre d’art de la cité mosane. Elle filme l’insouciance des enfants qui jouent, des flâneurs qui déambulent aux pieds des coteaux. Et puis surtout, elle filme Elise et Clémentine, deux fillettes qui jouent du Ukuele, qui fredonnent seules ou ensemble le Lion qui est mort ce soir d’Henri Salvador, sa gazelle et sa jungle profonde, et puis d’autres airs enfantins. Les deux fillettes se produisent sur une terrasse, un belvédère, panorama sur la ville. En contrebas, il y a une voie ferrée, des trains qui passent, dont le sourd roulement couvre parfois leurs mélodies. Elles sont à flan de coteaux et plus haut qu’elles, il y a la Citadelle de Liège, son Enclos des fusillés, son Bloc 24, là où sous l’occupation on enferma résistants et patriotes avant leur exécution ou leur déportation vers les camps de la mort, là où ce fut le tour des occupants, des inciviques et des collabos d’être internés lors de la libération en septembre 1944. Les deux films se répondent, se complètent, se confrontent. Charlotte Lagro a préféré la simultanéité à la succession. Le regard glisse dès lors d’un écran à l’autre, passe de l’hiver à l’été, du jour à la nuit, des voies de chemin de fer de la mort à celles de la vie, de la performance de Dönci Bánki à celle d’Elise et de sa copine Clémentine, des bouleaux d’Auschwitz aux coteaux de Liège, du silence atterré à l’insouciance des voix enfantines, d’un temps à un autre qui nous ramènent à notre présent. Projetés en boucle, les deux films n’ont pas un minutage identique. Ainsi se multiplient au fil des boucles les glissements de regards, ainsi interagissent en continu les bandes sonores, la composition de Jos Neto qui soutient la performance de Dönci Bánki, les chansons enfantines et le roulement des trains.

Elise et Clémentine ont l’âge d’aller voir les clowns. A Liège, le cirque s’arrête régulièrement sur l’esplanade toute proche de leur belvédère et des coteaux de la Citadelle. Lors de sa résidence, Charlotte Lagro a découvert dans les archives une photo prise à la Libération, les visages hagards de prisonniers allemands et de gestapistes internés à la Citadelle. Elle a confié des agrandissements de ce cliché à Elise, Clémentine et à quelque unes de leurs copines. Et celles-ci, les ont transformés, maquillés de leurs crayons de couleurs. En clowns sous les arcs-en-ciel.

1 Jean-Michel Frodon, Le jour de Jerry et la nuit, dans Traffic n°92, février 2014

2 Georges Didi-Huberman, Ecorces, Les Editions de Minuit, 2011

3 le scenario du film de Jerry Lewis est accessible à cette adresse : http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/the_day_the_clown_cried.html

What else ?, les images (2)

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier
Le Flair
Photo sketches, 1974-1977

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier

Benjamin Monti

Benjamin Monti,
Sans titre, 19 janvier 2016
Encre de chine sur carte perforée de la « Courage-Organisation SA », 21 x 14,7 cm

Benjamin Monti

Benjamin Monti,
Sans titre, 24 février 2016
Encre de chine sur carte perforée de la « Courage-Organisation SA », 21 x 14,7 cm

Benjamin Monti

Benjamin Monti,
Sans titre, 11 janvier 2016
Encre de chine sur carte perforée de la « Courage-Organisation SA », 21 x 14,7 cm

Benjamin Monti

Benjamin Monti,
Sans titre, 24 janvier 2016
Encre de chine sur carte perforée de la « Courage-Organisation SA », 21 x 14,7 cm

Benjamin Monti

Benjamin Monti,
Sans titre, 1er mai 2015
Encre de chine sur carte perforée de la « Courage-Organisation SA », 21 x 14,7 cm

Jacqueline Mesmarker

Jacqueline Mesmaeker
Passage I, 2016
Photographie couleurs, impression sur papier chiffon, 60 x 70 cm

Loop Festival Barcelona 2016, Eleni Kamma, Without Pause, Dialogues

La galerie Nadja Vilenne participe à Loop Fair Barcelona et montrera le dytique « The Day the Clown Cried » de Charlotte Lagro. Eleni Kamma participe à Loop Festival Barcelona. Elle y projette « Yar bana bir eğlence. Notes on Parrhesia », dans le cadre de l’exposition Without Pause, Dialogues, un projet dont Imma Pietro est commissaire.

Curated by Imma Prieto, « Without Pause, Dialogues » is the result of a collaboration between LOOP Barcelona, Argos – Centre for art and media, Flanders Arts Institute and Flanders Image.
Without Pause, Dialogues is an exhibition project made up of a dozen perspectives that establish six common lines of research. It is built around two determining factors: a formal one, which is concerned with matters unrelated to the work itself, and a conceptual one, which emerges from the desire for dialogue between the works in the form of diptychs (two adjacent screens). The dialogue fostered by the diptychs reinforces and highlights the contents of each one of the projects, thus creating a feedback loop between them.
María Ruido (Lo que no puede ser visto debe ser mostrado) & Sarah Vanagt & Katrien Vermeire (The Wave)
Lúa Coderch (ARKADI. A guide for the perplexed) & Ria Pacquée (As long as I see birds flying I know I am alive)
Jordi Cané (Una batalla más) & Pieter Geenen (Relocation)
Raquel Friera (Space of Possibles-Istanbul) & Els Opsomer (10th of November |09:05)
Patricia Dauder (March 5th 1979) & Elias Heuninck (I’ll be late for dinner)
Jordi Colomer (Svartlamon Parade) & Eleni Kamma (Notes of Parrhesia)

Reial Cercle Artístic
Carrer Arcs, 5, 08002, Barcelona
26 May — 10 June 2016

Yar bana bir eğlence. Notes on Parrhesia.
a single screen film by Eleni Kamma
duration: 37 min 24 sec (2015)

Eleni Kamma

Eleni Kamma

Eleni Kamma

In her first cinematographic film, artist Eleni Kamma revisits the tradition of the Karagoz Theatre and its role in the creation of a political voice.
Although Karagoz is a local character symbolizing the “little man” within the limits of the Ottoman Empire, he belongs to a larger puppet theatre family. He speaks of what the people want to hear and what the people want to say.

Until 1870, despite the “absolute monarchy and a totalitarian regime”, Karagoz “defied the censorship, enjoying an unlimited freedom”. Through the use of empty phrases, the illogical, the surrealistic, extreme obscenity and repetition, Karagoz theatre was often used as a political weapon to criticise local political and social abuse.
By 1923, this multi-voiced empire gave way to a Turkish-speaking republic within which the caricatures of ethnic characters no longer made sense. With the rise of new media, the popularity of Karagoz and Orta Oyunu declined even further.

Yar bana bir eğlence. Notes on Parrhesia. reflects upon the term “parrhesia”, which implies not only freedom of speech, but also the obligation to speak the truth for the common good, even at personal risk, by questioning how the notion of entertainment relates to personal expression and public participation.
This is where the artist links to the Gezi Park protests in 2013, in which humor and creativity were key elements in mocking the political regimes. Filmic fragments from National Cypriot television archive alternate with the voices of Cypriot, Greek and Turkish Karagoz masters discussing language, history, the tools and the political role of the medium.

The film is a visual essay in which pressing contemporary political matters intertwine with history and abstraction; and in which meticulousness of research meets with poetics of associations. How to move forward? Can we learn something from the old masters? At times the gaze is directed back to the viewer. To speak your mind, you must first overcome fear by taking a deep breath.

Loop Fair Barcelona 2016, 02-04.06, Charlotte Lagro, The Day the Clown Cried

Loop Barelona

La galerie Nadja Vilenne aura le plaisir de vous accueillir à Loop Fair Barcelona 2016

Galerie Nadja Vilenne is pleased to welcome you at Loop Fair Barcelona 2016

CHARLOTTE LAGRO
The Day the Clown Cried

 

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro

Charlotte Lagro
The Day the Clown Cried, 2015
Double channel, loop, HD video, colour, sound

LOOP FAIR
Thursday, 02.06.16
Professional public: 12 pm – 9 pm
Vernissage: 7.30 pm
Friday, 03.06.16
Professional public: 12 pm – 4 pm
General public: 4 pm – 8 pm
Saturday, 04.06.16
General public: 4 pm – 8 pm

TALKS AND PANEL DISCUSSIONS
A program of talks and panel discussions aimed at professionals will take place at the fair venue. Read more about it here.

LOOP FESTIVAL
The festival takes place in many venues across the city. Check each exhibition and activity for dates and hours.

Hotel Catalonia Ramblas
C/ Pelai 28 08001 Barcelona

Since 2003, LOOP Fair has been the first in its field exclusively dedicated to the discovery, promotion and acquisition of contemporary video art works. LOOP Fair strives to re-examine traditional art fair models and methods of presentation by taking into account both the changing attitudes of viewing and interacting with art, and the particularities of moving image practices. LOOP offers a unique viewing experience by presenting each film project in a room of a hotel, thus creating a setting that both focuses on the artists’ work and facilitates the particular attention required by this medium. LOOP brings together a strong sense of community between the concomitant fields of contemporary art and cinema, while establishing an occasion to promote and discuss artists’ video and film amidst a specialized audience.

 

Pol Pierart, Day for night, collection Antoine de Galbert, le SHED, Rouen

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart
Le bonheur, le malheur, 2001 (Film 14)
Film super 8 numérisé, couleurs, sans son, 00:06:48

Pol Pierart

Pol Pierart
Autoportrait avec ma Ville, 2005 (Film 15)
Film super 8 numérisé, noir et blanc, son, 00 :02 :43

Pol Pierart participe à l’exposition Day for Night, exposition de la collection vidéo d’Antoine de Galbert, collectionneur français et fondateur de la Maison Rouge. Portrait du collectionneur autant que collection de portraits d’artistes en acte, cette proposition s’inscrit dans le cadre du festival Normandie Impressionniste.

Vidéos de Pilar Albarracin, Michel Blazy, Blue Noses, Maxim Borolinov, Mohamed Bourouissa, Mircea Cantor, Patty Chang, Steven Cohen, Ann Hamilton, Elika Hedayat, Jean-Charles Hue, Sejla Kameric, Ange Leccia, Ramuntcho Matta, Tania Mouraud, Geert Mul, Hans Op de Beek, Lucien Pelen, Pol Pierart, Louise Pressager, Mika Rottenberg, Roman Signer, Stéphane Thidet, Barthélémy Toguo, Janaina Tschäpe, Adam Vackar, Where Dogs Run.

Exposition du 29 mai au 31 juillet 2016
Vernissage samedi 28 mai 2016 à partir de 18h30

Le communiqué de presse :

« Day for night » (ou nuit américaine) est une technique cinématographique permettant de filmer de jour, des scènes de nuit. Pour obtenir cette obscurité, propice à la projection d’images dans un lieu habituellement éclairé par la lumière du jour, les ouvertures du SHED ont été occultées, plongeant les 600 m2 de l’espace d’exposition dans la pénombre. Positionné au centre du lieu, un dispositif spécifique, fabriqué pour l’occasion, compose quatre surfaces de projection. Cube lumineux – sorte de lanterne magique –, il est entouré d’assises, permettant aux visiteurs de s’installer pour visionner 47 vidéos.
Ces 47 vidéos sont extraites de la collection d’Antoine de Galbert, collectionneur d’art français. A ce titre, elles incarnent les goûts et les obsessions d’un individu, ayant choisi de les partager en créant, en 2000, une fondation et un lieu d’exposition : la Maison Rouge. Foisonnante, la collection d’Antoine de Galbert témoigne de son intérêt pour les vanités – nature morte évoquant la fragilité et la brièveté de l’existence humaine. Cet intérêt se retrouve dans ses vidéos, où la performance, la mise en scène du corps de l’artiste par lui-même, voire la mise à l’épreuve du corps, occupent une place prépondérante. Ainsi dans The Chandelier Project (2002), performance filmée de Steven Cohen (artiste, performer et chorégraphe sud- africain né en 1962), l’artiste déambule sur talons hauts, maquillé et vêtu d’un lustre à pampilles, dans un township de Johannesburg voué à la démolition. Plus sarcastique, Barthélémy Toguo (né en 1967 au Cameroun, vit à Paris et Bandjoun) se met en scène dans The Thirsty Gardener, (2005) arrosant une plante en pot, faite de billets de banque. Minimaliste burlesque, Roman Signer (artiste suisse né en 1938) se montre, dans Punkt (2006), assis devant un chevalet, un pinceau à la main, sursautant au bruit d’un pétard qu’il a lui-même lancé et produisant ainsi la seule trace faisant le tableau…
Un programme chronométré permettra d’organiser sa visite comme on irait au cinéma, en choisissant sa séance. Chacun pourra venir spécialement pour découvrir le travail d’artistes de renommée internationale, tels que Michel Blazy (né en 1966 – une exposition se tient au Portique, au Havre, jusqu’au 2 juillet) et Mika Rottenberg (née en Argentine en 1976, dont une monographie ouvrira au Palais de Tokyo en juin prochain), présente dans l’exposition avec Sneeze (2012) ; d’artistes français émergents tels que Lucien Pélen (né en 1978 à Aubagne), dont le SHED présentera un ensemble de vidéos, frappantes par leur paysages sublimes et leur poésie beckettienne ; ou encore un ensemble de vidéos de Jean-Charles Hue, cinéaste et plasticien français né en 1968, remarqué pour deux de ses longs métrages : La BM du Seigneur (2011) et Mange tes morts : tu ne diras point (prix Jean-Vigo, 2014).
DAY FOR NIGHT sera la troisième exposition du SHED, nouveau lieu pour l’art contemporain, ouvert en septembre 2015, à l’initiative d’un groupe d’artistes et de curateurs. Il est situé dans une ancienne usine de mèche de bougie, l’usine Gresland, dans une vallée industrielle de l’agglomération de Rouen. La particularité du SHED est d’être géré par des artistes, qui ont collectivement acquis le lieu pour y aménager une résidence d’artistes, un espace d’exposition, des ateliers et des stockages.

What else ? Les images (1)

John Murphy

John Murphy

John Murphy
A Different Constellation (Lupus) 1994
Oil on linen, 290 x 335 cm

John Murphy

Exhibition view

John Murphy

John Murphy

John Murphy
The Song of the Flesh or The Dog who Shits (Lyra), 1993
Oil on canvas, 264 x 198,5 cm.

John Murphy

Exhibition View

John Murphy

John Murphy
The Invention of the Other (Vulpecula), 1994
Oil on canvas, 264 x 198,5 cm.

What else ?

Exhibition view

Jacques Charlier

Jacques Charlier
Paysages professionnels, 1970.
Photographies N.B. et texte imprimé.
9 panneaux de 50 x 60 cm

Suchan Kinoshita

Suchan Kinoshita
Jogger Fragment 8, 2006
Technique mixte

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad,
Boeing Over, 2003-2007
Photographies N.B. tirages argentiques sur papier baryté, 48 x 32 cm, marouflés sur aluminium, 2003-2007

What else ?

Exhibition view

Walter Swennen

Walter Swennen
Jime Dine slept here, 1990
Huile sur panneau, 122 x 110 cm

What else ?

Exhibition view

What else ?

Exhibition view

Emilio Lopez Menchero

Emilio Lopez Menchero
Trying to be Valie Export, 2016
Photographie NB marouflée sur aluminium, 105 x 135 cm