Art Brussels 2016, preview (2), Aglaia Konrad, Sophie Langohr, Emilio Lopez-Menchero

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad
Demolition City
Photographie NB, tirage argentique, 40 x 60 cm
1992-2016

Aglaia Konrad

Aglaia Konrad
Demolition City
Photographie NB, tirage argentique, 40 x 60 cm
1992-2016

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Sainte Bernadette, plâtre polychrome, fin du XIXe siècle, Grand Curtius, Liège (détail), 2016
Photographie NB, 56 x 38 cm

Sophie Langohr

Sophie Langohr
Vierge assise avec l’Enfant,
chêne sculpté polychrome, milieu du XIVe siècle, conservé au Grand Curtius de Liège, sculpture en chêne d’après un moulage intérieur
2016

Emilio Lopez Menchero

Emilio Lopez Menchero
Trying to be Valie Export, 2016
Photographie NB marouflée sur aluminium, 105 x 135 cm

A propos de Valie Export, Action Pants: Genital Panic

Action Pants: Genital Panic is a set of six identical posters from a larger group that the artist produced to commemorate an action she performed in Munich in 1968. The posters show EXPORT sitting on a bench against a wall out of doors wearing crotchless trousers and a leather shirt and holding a machine-gun. Her feet are bare and vulnerable, as are her genitals, and she holds the gun at chest level, apparently in readiness to turn it on the viewer towards whom her gaze is directed. Her hair stands up in a wild mop above her head, emphasising the strangeness of the image.The action that gave rise to the photograph Action Pants: Genital Panic has become the subject of apocryphal art historical legend. EXPORT performed Genital Panic in Munich in an art cinema where experimental film-makers were showing their work. Wearing trousers from which a triangle had been removed at the crotch, the artist walked between the rows of seated viewers, her exposed genitalia at face-level. This confrontation challenged the perceived cliché of women’s historical representation in the cinema as passive objects denied agency. (…)

The black and white photograph, Action Pants: Genital Panic, was taken by the photographer Peter Hassmann in Vienna in 1969. EXPORT had it screenprinted as a poster in a large edition of unknown size in order to flypost the image in public spaces and on the streets. At the end of the 1960s, the notions of guerrilla warfare and revolution on which it played were particularly pertinent – in 1967, the famous Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara was executed, and the following year students rioted in Paris, and the American cities of Baltimore and Washinton DC were shaken by civil unrest after the murder of Martin Luther King. In 1994 the image was flyposted in Berlin, where EXPORT was teaching at the Hochschüle der Kunste (the Academy of Arts). Tate’s holding of six, which the artist has specified should be exhibited as a group, reflects this history of the image by emphasising its status as a multiple. Another photograph with the same title taken by Hassmann in 1969 shows the artist sitting on a wooden chair next to a wall in a room with a parquet floor. She wears the same outfit and holds the same gun, but she has incongruously feminine sandals on her feet and holds the gun pointing upwards. This version of the image was issued in 2001 as a gelatine print in an edition of twenty. In Action Pants: Genital Panic EXPORT defends her female body with the male phallic symbol of the gun. Her self-exposure emphasises her lack of a penis, demonstrating the symbol of power to be a prosthetic and its possession to be a product of role play, positing action over biology. The combination of macho aggression with femininity is typical of EXPORT’s imagery from the late 1960s and early 1970s. (Source : Tate Modern, London)