Archives de catégorie : John Murphy

John Murphy, Figure/s : drawings after Bellmer, Drawing Room, London

John Murphy participe à l’exposition Figure/s, drawings after Bellmer au Drawing Room, à Londres. Du 10 septembre au 31 octobre.

FIGURE/S: drawing after Bellmer explores the body as a site of oppression, liberation and troubling pleasures through the work of modern and contemporary artists. It takes as its starting point the radical and transgressive drawings of Hans Bellmer (1902-1975), whose work simultaneously mimicked and resisted the dehumanisation performed by fascism and racism. His drawings have had a powerful influence, sometimes subterranean, on many artists across the world in both high and popular culture, from French Surrealism to Japanese manga. Recently there has been an upsurge of interest in his work, especially the drawings, by younger contemporary artists. 

The exhibition explores Bellmer’s lasting influence on artists and thinkers through work by twenty modern and contemporary artists from Japan, UK, Lebanon, Nigeria, Germany, France and US. It includes carefully selected drawings made by Bellmer in the 1940s to 60s, by his partner Unica Zürn in the 1960s, by Richard Hamilton in the 1950s and by the Lebanese artist Huguette Caland in the 1970s. These modern works are combined with contemporary approaches that relate to feminism, gender fluidity and anti-racism, including new commissions by Mathew Hale, Rebecca Jagoe, Aura Satz and Marianna Simnett. Bellmer’s influence in Japan is represented by the work of Fuyuko Matsui, Kumi Machida and Tabaimo and the exhibition also includes Paul Chan, Neil Gall, Sharon Kivland, Jade Montserrat, Jean-Luc Moulène, John Murphy, Paul Noble, Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Chloe Piene.

Bellmer grew up with the rise of National Socialism in Germany, with its antagonism towards ‘degenerate’ bodies and celebration of the ideal human form. Through the production of hundreds of drawings and the two dolls he constructed in the early 1930s and photographed in disturbing and scandalous scenarios, Bellmer defigured and refigured the body in pursuit of unimagined sensations. He likened the body to a sentence that can be dismantled and recomposed, an interest shared with Unica Zürn, the artist, poet and writer who had a relationship with Bellmer from 1953 until her premature death in 1970. For drawings ‘after’ Bellmer, the phallocentric focus of his enquiry is superseded by approaches that challenge and split the subject to embrace multiplicity and creaturely freedom.

Bellmer wrote: ‘If the origin of my work is scandalous it is because, for me, the world is a scandal’. His work has continued to scandalise and this exhibition takes a critical look at its content whilst acknowledging Bellmer’s innovative production of ambiguous and disturbing images that have renewed significance today in their exploration of androgyny and confusion of the real and the virtual.

 

Exhibition view

Left : John Murphy, Mariole-Marionette, 2016. Engraving, watercolour, pencil on paper, 108 x 73 cm. 

Right : John Murphy (b.London 1945), The painter’s eye, at once mouth, skin, ear, penis, vagina, throat, and all the rest, 2016. Reproduction and pencil on paper, 108 x 73 cm

This image is a reproduction of a print of a Bellmer drawing; the hermaphrodite figure was used as the frontispiece to a novel by Monique Appel, Qui livre son mystère meurt sans joie (The one who cedes their mystery dies without joy). The hand-written text, which is also the title, is adapted from Julia Kristeva’s novel Possessions; the quotation continues ‘for a painter’s eye covers first the five senses, then the incalculable rest of the body, with a thin film that makes visible what cannot be seen.’ The narrator is considering painters who depicted decapitations, contemplating, in the novel, the decapitated body of her murdered friend Gloria. Both image and text are cut from their contexts and the viewer is left to create new connections in the space in-between.

John Murphy, Fig 30, 2021. Invitation card, book, 25 x 42 cm

John Murphy, the movement of thought, an edition by Massimo Minini, Spring 2020

THE MOVEMENT OF THOUGHT

by John Murphy

An edition of  Galleria Massimo Minini – Spring 2020

4 signed and numbered copies + I AP – Two volumes each, bound in grey cloth

Comprising the following artist books:

1975. J. M. Selected Works, Jack Wendler, London, 210 x 147 mm – 80 pages

1985.  ‘Stuck in the Milky Way’, Lisson Gallery, London, 254 x 217 mm – 32 pages

1987-8.  ‘John Murphy’,  Whitechapel Gallery, London, Arnolfini Gallery, Bristol, 270 x 220 mm – 32 pages

1990.  ‘Silent Vertigo’, Lisson Gallery, London, 260 x 270 mm – 16pages

1991. ‘Inaugural Violence’, Christine Burgin Gallery, John Weber Gallery, New York 280 x 216 mm – 18 pages

1996.   ‘A Portrait of the Artist as a Deaf Man’, Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin, 307 x 245 mm – 16 pages

1996.  ‘Navigating in Madness’, Galerie de Luxembourg, Luxembourg, 307 x 245 mm – 16 pages

1997.  ’John Murphy’, Villa Arson, Nice, 269 x 212 mm – 36 pages

2003.  ‘The Way Up and The Way Down’, Southampton City Art Gallery and Museum, Southampton, 212 x 160 mm – 32 pages

2004-5.  ‘And Things Throw Light on Things’, Ikon Gallery and Barber Institute Birmingham, 297 x 248 mm – 32 pages

2006. (Between the Acts), Lisson Gallery, London, 240 x 170 mm – 28 + II pages

2006.  ‘…the stench of shit…’  Galerie Erna Hecey, Brussels, 281 x 191 mm – 30 pages

2013.  ‘Of Voyages, Of Other Places’, Trondheim kunstmuseum, Trondheim, 285 x 215 mm – 16 pages

2013.  Epreuve(Voyage Towards the Edge of the Night) Gevaert Editions, Brussels, 345 x 265 mm – 10 pages

During FRIEZE 2019, on a sunny day in October, I met as every year, my old friend John Murphy. Almost my age, an artist who I admire without having an occasion to collaborate. After our meeting I decided to visit his studio in Hackney, East London, to have a look with him at his recent work. Searching around in the room we gathered together, one by one, all his publications. I was so impressed by the quality of these slim books that I had the idea of presenting them all together. The body of books illustrate perfectly the story of the art of JOHN MURPHY, born in England in 1945 of Irish immigrant parents. John Murphy continues to live and work in Hackney, in his beautiful and peaceful home … a space for thought …

Massimo Minini – John Murphy

John Murphy, Opera Monde. La quête d’un art total, Centre Pompidou Metz, les images

 

John Murphy, Opera Monde. La quête d’un art total, Centre Pompidou Metz

John Murphy participe à l’exposition « Opera Monde. La quête d’un art total » organisée au Centre Pompidou Metz, en résonance avec la célébration des 350 ans de l’Opéra national de Paris.

Arnold Schönberg, Moses und Aron, partition autographe, 17 juillet 1930
Encre sur papier à musique, 35,5 x 27 cm
Vienne, Arnold Schönberg Center, inv. : MS 63_2771
Used by permission of Belmont Music Publishers, Los Angeles

Opéra Monde témoigne de la rencontre entre les arts visuels et l’opéra aux XXe et XXIe siècles. Plus qu’une exposition consacrée aux scénographies d’opéra réalisées par des artistes, elle entend mettre en lumière, en résonance, ou au contraire en tension avec l’héritage du Gesamtkunstwerk (concept d’œuvre d’art totale) wagnérien, comment les arts visuels et le genre lyrique se sont nourris mutuellement, et parfois même influencés de manière radicale. Dans ce mouvement de va-et-vient, l’opéra sert ainsi de terrain fertile d’expérimentations et de ferment pour de nouvelles sensibilités esthétiques et politiques.

Exposer aujourd’hui l’opéra a plus d’un sens. C’en est fini avec le mythe du « dernier opéra ». « Il faut faire sauter les maisons d’opéra », déclarait Pierre Boulez en 1967. Si la sentence semblait tomber comme un verdict fatal et définitif, on peut constater que le genre a, au contraire, donné lieu tout au long du XXe siècle et précisément ces dernières décennies, à d’importantes et remarquables créations. La spectacularisation dénoncée alors a amplement touché les autres domaines artistiques. L’opéra comme lieu du spectaculaire permet, dès lors, d’explorer sous un angle nouveau cette théâtralité innervant de plus en plus, après des années d’un art plus conceptuel, le champ de l’art contemporain.

Présentant des maquettes, costumes, éléments de scénographie, autant que d’imposantes installations et de nouvelles créations, le parcours, qui mêle images et sons, montre comment l’opéra est la fois une manufacture de désirs artistiques partagés autant qu’un symbole de liberté. Des expériences scéniques des premières avant-gardes, telles que La Main heureuse (1910-1913) d’Arnold Schönberg, aux partitions durablement inscrites au programme des grandes salles comme Saint François d’Assise (1983) d’Olivier Messiaen, en passant par des formes plus expérimentales, mais emblématiques, comme Einstein on the Beach (1976) de Philip Glass et Bob Wilson, Opéra Monde esquisse une cartographie différente de l’interdisciplinarité.

Se déployant en différentes sections thématiques, allant de la scène comme peinture en mouvement, aux productions politiques et parfois utopiques, de formes plus radicales et de nouveaux lieux d’opéra, à la féérie ou encore la fureur des mythes, le projet prend essentiellement pour focus une sélection de créations représentatives de ces relations fructueuses scèneartiste. Certains grands classiques – La Flûte enchantée, ou Norma – sont également exposés, soulignant comment le répertoire manié avec audace, a servi à la fois de lieu de transgression, de transformation, tout en garantissant une certaine pérennité du genre.

L’exposition questionne la capacité même d’une exposition, sinon à restituer, du moins à évoquer le pouvoir sensoriel de l’opéra et son caractère envoûtant. Un important travail de réactivation de certaines créations du passé, de même que certaines commandes passées à des artistes contemporains, permettent de montrer la passion que suscite encore le genre aujourd’hui, et de plonger le visiteur dans la magie singulière du spectacle lyrique.

Prolongeant la réflexion sur les affinités électives entre le spectacle et les arts visuels – portée par de précédents projets, parmi lesquels Musisircus ou Oskar Schlemmer. L’homme qui danse, l’exposition Opéra Monde questionne la théâtralité qui innerve les champs de l’art moderne et contemporain, avec une résonance d’autant plus forte qu’elle s’inscrit dans le cadre du 350e anniversaire de l’Opéra national de Paris, berceau de gestes artistiques novateurs – ceux de Bill Viola, Romeo Castellucci ou Clément Cogitore, pour ne citer qu’eux.

Du 22 juin 2019 au 27 Janvier 2020. Centre Pompidou-Metz , Galerie 3

Art Brussels 2019, preview & highlights (1)

Jacques Charlier
Paysages professionnels, 1964-1970
Photographies NB, tapuscrit, certificat, (3) x 78 x 108 cm

A propos des Paysages professionnels : lire ici

Jacqueline Mesmaeker
Versailles avant sa construction, 1981
Photographie noir et blanc, encadrement, cartel, 70 x 83 cm

Jacqueline Mesmaeker,
Versailles après sa destruction, 2018
transfert sur miroir, 63,5 x 40,5 cm

Jacqueline Mesmaeker
Bourses de ceinture (détail), 2018
soie et velours, 20 x 6 cm chacune

photos : Isabelle Arthuis

A propos de Versailles… : lire ici

Aglaia Konrad
Selinunte, 2017
Héliogravure, 58,45 x 79,2 cm, 2019
ed 3 + 2 a.p.

John Murphy
Between Anguish and Desire – Between Vomit and Thirst. 2004
85.5 x 71.5 cm Photographic print, pen and ink on board, 85.5 x 71.5 cm

John Murphy
Between Anguish and Desire – Between Vomit and Thirst. 2004
85.5 x 71.5 cm Photographic print, pen and ink on board, 85.5 x 71.5 cm

Brecht Koelman
2017-01-19
Huile sur toile, 30 x 45 cm

2018, une rétrospective

10-12.2018
Dans le cadre de Reciprocity Liège Design 2018
Suchan Kinoshita – David Polzin

10-12.2018
Dans le cadre de Reciprocity Liège Design 2018
Jacques Lizène

10-12.2018
Dans le cadre de Reciprocity Liège Design 2018
Alevtina Kakhidze

09-2018
Viennacontemporary 2018 : Michael Dans – Maen Florin

09-2018
Drawing Room Montpellier – La Panacée – Moco : Benjamin Monti

08-09.2018
Jacques Halbert, HTFAM (How to fuck a monochrome)

06-07.2018
Harem, Aglaia Konrad, Projekt Skulptur and guest : Suchan Kinoshita, Isofolies.

06-07.2018
Willem Vermeersch, When You Come to a Fork in the Road, Take It

06-07.2018
Emilio Lopez-Menchero, Paintings

06-07.2018
Gaëtane Verbruggen

04.2018
Art Brussels
Jacques Charlier, Michael Dans, Lili Dujourie, Maen Florin, Olivier Foulon, Suchan Kinoshita, Aglaia Konrad, Jacqueline Mesmaeker, John Murphy, Marie Zolamian

03-05.2018
Michaël Dans, that kind of wonderfull

02.2018
Arco Madrid 2018 – Maen Florin (solo)

Fiac Paris 2017, les images (1)

Fiac 2017

Fiac 2017

Exhibitions views

Fiac 2017

Aglaia Konrad. Demolition City, 1992-2016,
20 épreuves à la gélatine argentine sur papier baryte.

Konrad’s photography plays with notions of «original » and « index, » « nature » and « culture, » with the fact that the original « stone » cannot be dated and with its « social » shaping in the historic present. This reversibility is further witnessed in Demolition City (1991/2016) the photographie series she made of the demolition of a terrace of houses on Rosier Faassenstraat in Rotterdam, which looks as if it might read either way, forwards or backwards, reiterating both the construction or deconstruction of walls, floors, and roofs.(…) (Penelope Curtis, From A to K)

Fiac 2017

Suchan Kinoshita, viewer desk, custumised viewers

Fiac 2017

Olivier Foulon
Sans titre (un citron), 2017
Sans titre (un citron), 2017

Fiac 2017

John Murphy

John Murphy
Cadere. Waste and Cadavers All, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm

Fiac 2017

Fiac 2017

John Murphy
As high above as the ditch is deep, 2015
Stuffed Black Rooster, rope, variable dimensions

John Murphy

John Murphy
In the Midst of Falling: The Cry… 2016
C-print (Unique), Satin Float Glass and Gesso Wood Frame, 145.4 x 241.8 cm

Fiac 2017

John Murphy

John Murphy
Fall upward, to a height ( verso & recto), 2015
Photograph, pen and ink on board. (2) x 78 x 54 cm

(…) John Murphy has a similar respect for art from the recent past. His art resembles a pantheon of signs that transmit poetic experience. He engages with existing works from a modernist body of literature, painting and film, and particularly with a number of ‘authors’ who (re) invented Symbolism (Mallarmé, Magritte, Resnais). His work often comes in the form of delicate objects or images that sit or hang lightly in a space, like a spider’s web or celestial notations. In fact the physical space between the elements in his work is essential and signifies the mental space that opens up when a visitor tracks the (symbolical) lines that connect the elements, and when words, images and associations reveal themselves. Our exhibition features a body of works inspired by the notion of the fall, especially the fall from grace recounted in Genesis, when Adam and Eve are expelled from the Garden of Eden, as famously depicted by the Italian painter Masaccio in a fierce and moving fresco. Masaccio’s painting returns in Murphy’s epic, newly made photograph In The Midst of Falling. The Cry (2015), which derives from a charged image in Joseph Losey’s film Eve (1962), where a woman is transfixed in a hallway before a reproduction of the painting. Murphy is like a dancer aiming for a light gesture, because for him it is the most powerful conduit of experience. His titles, resourceful and full of sillent threat, create a world in itself.(…)

Fiac 2017

John Murphy, Art on paper 2017, BOZAR, les images

John Murphy
Exhibition view

John Murphy

John Murphy
For the eyes of dogs to come, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm

John Murphy

John Murphy
Words fall like stones, like corpses, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm

John Murphy

John Murphy
Cadere. Waste and Cadavers All, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm

John Murphy

Exhibition view

John Murphy

John Murphy
Nothing, Wait and See, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm

John Murphy

John Murphy
Not there, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm

« Que Domenico ait commencé le Divertissement au lendemain de l’effondrement de la République ne doit pas surprendre. Il ne s’agissait pas pour lui, comme on a pu le suggérer, de fuir la réalité mais, tout au contraire, d’une proximité avec le réel et l’histoire qui appartient depuis le début à l’histoire du comique. C’est un fait sur lequel il ne faudrait jamais cesser de réfléchir : les comédies d’Aristophane ont été écrites lors d’un moment décisif, ou plutôt catastrophique de l’histoire d’Athènes. En s’enfermant à Zianigo en compagnie de Polichinelle, Giandomenico ne choisit ni la farce, ni la tragédie. Il ne s’agit pas davantage, comme les interprètes le répètent à l’envi, de désenchantement ou de désillusion, mais bien plutôt d’une sobre méditation sur la fin ». Ces phrases sont du philosophe Giorgio Agamben qui a récemment consacré un fort dense petit opus au personnage de Polichinelle : « Polichinelle ou Divertissement pour les jeunes gens en quatre scènes » s’inspire d’une œuvre tardive de Domenico Tiepolo, ce « Divertimento per li Regazzi », un album regroupant un ensemble de 104 dessins réalisés entre 1795 et 1804, une vie sans queue ni tête de Pulchinello, ce personnage central de la Commedia dell Arte.

John Murphy s’est également intéressé aux dessins des Tiepolo et à la figure même de Pulcinello, cette collection de personnages, car Pulcinello est multiple et même nombreux, tout en étant, en quelque sorte, qu’une seule existence qui mange des gnocchis et fait des lazzis, toutes ces sortes de plaisanteries burlesques, grimaces et gestes grotesques. Déjà en 2006, alors qu’il fait sienne cette image extraite de La Grande Bouffe, la « grande abbuflata », de Marco Ferreri (1973), séminaire gastronomique et suicide collectif de quatre hommes fatigués de leurs vies ennuyeuses et de leurs désirs inassouvis et qui bouffent dès lors jusqu’à ce que mort s’ensuive, John Murphy rapproche ce plan où l’on voit Ugo Tognazi s’apprêtant à donner la pâtée à Michel Piccoli de quelques dessins des Tiepolo, père et fils, Giambattista et Giandomenico : des Pulchinello masqués, ventrus, pansus, bossus, constamment occupés à cuisiner des gnocchis, à les manger, à les digérer, à les déféquer.

Plus récemment, John Murphy a sélectionné une série des dessins de la vie de Pulcinello, ce divertissement pour les jeunes gens. Tout l’art de Murphy consiste à rassembler une constellation de signes révélateurs d’une expérience poétique. Il dialogue sans cesse avec des œuvres existantes provenant pour la plupart d’un corpus littéraire, pictural, cinématographique. En ce cas, il a fait des copies de certains de ces dessins de Giandomenico Tiepolo et les a masqué, les recouvrant du sfumato d’une couche de gouache blanche. Ensuite, à la plume, il a retracé les motifs sous-jacents qui l’intéressent, comme s’il désirait nous révéler le secret de Polichinelle, sans aucun doute Pulchinello lui-même, affublé de son masque, doté de son gros nez crochu, portant sur la tête un étrange chapeau, sommet de sa difformité, revêtu de son costume blanc et spectral, confondu à la gouache, personnage grotesque, touchant et effrayant à la fois, sans cesse au bord de la chute entre une invivable tragédie de la destinée et le comique des situations, la comédie comme inéluctable répétition du caractère. A la fois, Murphy ravive le souvenir des dessins de Domenico Tiepolo, les révèle et s’en écarte, les efface, ne conservant que ce qu’il estime nécessaire à son propos. La compagnie des polichinelles s’affaire et s’agite, se montre du doigt. Rien pourtant n’empêchera la perte, la chute, la fin en soi. Le sublime et le grotesque se côtoient, l’un et l’autre évoquent la finitude de la condition humaine, ce dévalement de la vie qui se dissout dans la multiplicité et l’affairement. John Murphy a conservé quelques petits chiens qui hantent les dessins de Tiepolo. Me reviennent ces quelques phrases écrites par Nietzsche dans le « Gai Savoir » : « J’ai donné un nom à ma souffrance et je l’appelle « chien », — elle est tout aussi fidèle, tout aussi importune et impudente, tout aussi divertissante, tout aussi avisée qu’une autre chienne — et je puis l’apostropher et passer sur elle mes mauvaises humeurs : comme font d’autres gens avec leurs chiens, leurs valets et leurs femmes ».

Art on Paper with BOZAR, John Murphy, The Tiepolo series

John Murphy

John Murphy
Not there, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm.

« Que Domenico ait commencé le Divertissement au lendemain de l’effondrement de la République ne doit pas surprendre. Il ne s’agissait pas pour lui, comme on a pu le suggérer, de fuir la réalité mais, tout au contraire, d’une proximité avec le réel et l’histoire qui appartient depuis le début à l’histoire du comique. C’est un fait sur lequel il ne faudrait jamais cesser de réfléchir : les comédies d’Aristophane ont été écrites lors d’un moment décisif, ou plutôt catastrophique de l’histoire d’Athènes. En s’enfermant à Zianigo en compagnie de Polichinelle, Giandomenico ne choisit ni la farce, ni la tragédie. Il ne s’agit pas davantage, comme les interprètes le répètent à l’envi, de désenchantement ou de désillusion, mais bien plutôt d’une sobre méditation sur la fin ». Ces phrases sont du philosophe Giorgio Agamben qui a récemment consacré un fort dense petit opus au personnage de Polichinelle : « Polichinelle ou Divertissement pour les jeunes gens en quatre scènes » s’inspire d’une œuvre tardive de Domenico Tiepolo, ce « Divertimento per li Regazzi », un album regroupant un ensemble de 104 dessins réalisés entre 1795 et 1804, une vie sans queue ni tête de Pulchinello, ce personnage central de la Commedia dell Arte.

John Murphy s’est également intéressé aux dessins des Tiepolo et à la figure même de Pulcinello, cette collection de personnages, car Pulcinello est multiple et même nombreux, tout en étant, en quelque sorte, qu’une seule existence qui mange des gnocchis et fait des lazzis, toutes ces sortes de plaisanteries burlesques, grimaces et gestes grotesques. Déjà en 2006, alors qu’il fait sienne cette image extraite de La Grande Bouffe, la « grande abbuflata », de Marco Ferreri (1973), séminaire gastronomique et suicide collectif de quatre hommes fatigués de leurs vies ennuyeuses et de leurs désirs inassouvis et qui bouffent dès lors jusqu’à ce que mort s’ensuive, John Murphy rapproche ce plan où l’on voit Ugo Tognazi s’apprêtant à donner la pâtée à Michel Piccoli de quelques dessins des Tiepolo, père et fils, Giambattista et Giandomenico : des Pulchinello masqués, ventrus, pansus, bossus, constamment occupés à cuisiner des gnocchis, à les manger, à les digérer, à les déféquer.

Plus récemment, John Murphy a sélectionné une série des dessins de la vie de Pulcinello, ce divertissement pour les jeunes gens. Tout l’art de Murphy consiste à rassembler une constellation de signes révélateurs d’une expérience poétique. Il dialogue sans cesse avec des œuvres existantes provenant pour la plupart d’un corpus littéraire, pictural, cinématographique. En ce cas, il a fait des copies de certains de ces dessins de Giandomenico Tiepolo et les a masqué, les recouvrant du sfumato d’une couche de gouache blanche. Ensuite, à la plume, il a retracé les motifs sous-jacents qui l’intéressent, comme s’il désirait nous révéler le secret de Polichinelle, sans aucun doute Pulchinello lui-même, affublé de son masque, doté de son gros nez crochu, portant sur la tête un étrange chapeau, sommet de sa difformité, revêtu de son costume blanc et spectral, confondu à la gouache, personnage grotesque, touchant et effrayant à la fois, sans cesse au bord de la chute entre une invivable tragédie de la destinée et le comique des situations, la comédie comme inéluctable répétition du caractère. A la fois, Murphy ravive le souvenir des dessins de Domenico Tiepolo, les révèle et s’en écarte, les efface, ne conservant que ce qu’il estime nécessaire à son propos. La compagnie des polichinelles s’affaire et s’agite, se montre du doigt. Rien pourtant n’empêchera la perte, la chute, la fin en soi. Le sublime et le grotesque se côtoient, l’un et l’autre évoquent la finitude de la condition humaine, ce dévalement de la vie qui se dissout dans la multiplicité et l’affairement. John Murphy a conservé quelques petits chiens qui hantent les dessins de Tiepolo. Me reviennent ces quelques phrases écrites par Nietzsche dans le « Gai Savoir » : « J’ai donné un nom à ma souffrance et je l’appelle « chien », — elle est tout aussi fidèle, tout aussi importune et impudente, tout aussi divertissante, tout aussi avisée qu’une autre chienne — et je puis l’apostropher et passer sur elle mes mauvaises humeurs : comme font d’autres gens avec leurs chiens, leurs valets et leurs femmes ».

Art on Paper with BOZAR, John Murphy, 7-10 septembre

ART ON PAPER 2017 BOZAR BRUSSELS

JOHN MURPHY

La galerie Nadja Vilenne aura le plaisir
de vous accueillir sur son stand 22
Galerie Nadja Vilenne is pleased
to welcome you at booth 22

07.09 > 10.09. 2017

Preview and opening (by invitation only)
Wednesday 06.9 – 7 pm > 11.30 pm

John Murphy

John Murphy, Words fall like stones, like corpses, 2015. Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board , 48 × 54 cm

special guest by ART ON PAPER & BOZAR

ALEVTINA KAKHIDZE
I still draw love, plants and things (2017)

Thursday 07.9 – 11 am > 7 pm
Friday 08.9 – 11 am > 7 pm
Saturday 09.9 – 11 am – 7 pm> 10 pm
Sunday 10.9 – 11 am > 7 pm

Terarken rooms,
BOZAR
Rue Ravenstein 23,
1000 Bruxelles