Archives par étiquette : John Murphy

Art Brussels 2024, les images

Aglaia Konrad
I love Rückbau, 2020
Video, color, sound, flatscreen, 16:9 vertical, 19 min.
 
Aglaia Konrad
Footnote 1. CAT, 2020
Digital print, clip frame, 42 × 30 cm
 
Aglaia Konrad
Footnote 3. Concrete, 2020
Digital print, clip frame, 42 × 30 cm
 
Aglaia Konrad
Footnote 2. Rückbaukristall, 2015
Digital print, clip frame, 42 × 30 cm
Michiel Ceulers
“Your clock will never fade like a flower (ah non je ne fais plus ça)”, 2024
oil, gloss, spray paint, wooden pieces, perspex, collage on canvas and wooden panel
60 × 103 cm
Suchan Kinoshita
Hängen Herum No. 5/6, 2023
metal, JBL flip essential, son

John Murphy
Selected works #2, #3, #6, #23, 1973
musical partitions, vitrine, h.99 cm
Jacqueline Mesmaeker
Contours clandestins, 2020
crayon sur papier, (10) x 42 x 29,7 cm
Aglaia Konrad
Shaping Stones, 2023
Impression sur bâche
Exhibition view
Alevtina Kakhidze
Sans titre, 2023
technique mixte sur papier, 20,5 x 15 cm, 2023
Michiel Ceulers
Immer Realistischere Malerei / Je cherche quelqu’un, 2024
Oil, acrylic and acrylic mirrors on canvas in found frame, 64 x 52 cm (4500) 
Benjamin Monti
Sans titres, de la série Miniatures, 2020 – 2022. 
Collages de photocopies, 9 x 9 cm (encadrés 25,5 x 18,5 cm)
Michel Assenmaker
Florence Delay, 2022
Collage, documents, 37,5 x 47 cm
 
Michel Assenmaker
Blumen, 2022
Collage, documents, 37,5 x 47 cm
 
Michel Assenmaker
Sans titre, 2021
Collage, documents, 37,5 x 47 cm
 
Michel Assenmaker
Berthe, 2021
Collage, documents, 37,5 x 47 cm
John Murphy
Portrait of the Artist as a Deaf Man, 1996
Framed photographic print, 70 x 60 cm
Michiel Ceulers
Pierre, Jacques et Jean endormis (thirty pieces of silver running away), 2024
Oil, spray paint, pigment and caulk on canvas / artist made frame; oil & caulk on canvas on wood, staples, 88 x 77 cm

Art Brussels, preview, John Murphy, Suchan Kinoshita, Michiel Ceulers

One of ltalo Calvino’s ‘Six Memos for the Next Millenium’ is concerned with the question of ‘lightness’. Quoting the De Rerum Natura of Lucretius, he muses on the idea that knowledge of the world tends to dissolve its solidity, leading to a perception of ail that is infinitely light and mobile. He talks, too (for these essays were conceived as lectures), of ‘the sudden agile leap of the poet-philosopher who raises himself above the weight of the world, showing that with all his gravity he has the secret of lightness. Lucretius, he tells us, is a poet of the physical and the concrete, who nonetheless proposes that emptiness is as dense as solid matter. Just so, as lightness is inseparable from precision and determination. ‘One should be light like a bird, and not like a feather’, said the poet Paul Valéry.

If lightness has to do with the subtraction of weight, then this body of work by John Murphy is light. Several of these canvases carry merely the delineation of an ear; the others refer to the state of being that remains when all weight has been removed. ‘Selected Works’, blank music paper bound and displayed in vitrines, push that liminal state a step further into the unknown, for they exist in a permanent state of potentiality, somewhere between birth and death.

A point of entry into this weightless world may be through ‘A Portrait of the Artist as a Deaf Man’, a recent work based on a painting by Sir Joshua Reynolds. To those who are in possession of all their senses, the condition of deafness, like that of blindness, can suggest both isolation and an acute awareness of an inner world. ln conjunction with ‘Selected Works’, are we to suppose that the artist, within himself, hears echoes of Baudelaire’s « La Musique », which was inspired by the work of the deaf composer, Beethoven? (‘l feel all the passions of a groaning ship vibrate within me, the fair wind andthe tempest’s rage cradle me on the fathomless deep- or else there is a fiat cairn, the giant mirror of my despair’). But perhaps he can hear nothing at all?

There is solitude in John Murphy’s work, as well as a little irony and a touch of the comic. (Calvino, again, remarks that ‘melancholy is sadness that has taken on lightness. Humour is comedy that has lost its bodily weight’). The space in these paintings is unidentifiable; it is neither close nor distant. So, too, is their colour, which is poised but unstable. Pink passes into blue; blue passes into pink.

Music and the metaphysical are seldom far apart. It is in and through music that many of us feel most intimately in the presence of meaning that cannot verbally be expressed. Murphy’s ‘Selected Works’ are either so full of meaning that they are inexpressible or, quite plainly, they have never existed. Like his paintings, the ‘Selected Works’ invoke the aesthetics of the sublime; they present the unpresentable to demonstrate that there is something conceivable which is not perceptible to the senses. The experience of the sublime, according to Kant, accords us simultaneous grief and pleasure, because it both opens and conceals. The sublime impedes the beautiful; it destabilizes good taste.

Francois Lyotard, who has written about a connection between the aesthetics of the sublime and postmodernism, suggests that it is the business of contemporary culture to invent allusions to the conceivable that cannot be presented – not to enjoy them but to impart a new sense of the unpresentable. Calvino makes a comparable point, more wonderfully. ‘Think what it would be like to have a work conceived from outside the self, he writes, ‘a work that would let us escape the limited perspective of the individual, not only to enter into selves like our own but to give speech to that which has no language, to the bird perching on the edge of the gutter, to the bee in spring and the tree in fall, to stone, to cement, to plastic… ‘. John Murphy conveys to us the activity of absence – its force and inner vitality.

John Hutchinson

Dublin, August 1996.

By titling her exhibition “Architectural Psychodramas,” Suchan Kinoshita effectively provides the salient keywords that lead to a possible mode of reception. Kinoshita invariably eschews fixed categories and definitions; she loves the changeable and the speculative. For her, architecture is built space, environmental space that influences us, but also some- thing that we shape. “Psychodramas,” experiences, memories and emotions stick to it, but without necessarily congealing; they remain changeable. This understanding of time and space, replete with the subject-object groupings and contexts of meaning that are constantly updated within it, also resonates recognizably in her background in music and performance art. The individual elements in the exhibition are not given one single role or meaning. Rather, it is about their “potential as objects,” as Eran Schaerf described it in the catalogue for Kinoshita’s exhibition at Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2010). As a result, there are countless connections to be discovered between the totality of the assembled elements, which coalesce and condense in a number of themes and ideas, no sooner to jump into another context once more. (…)

Suchan Kinoshita produce sounds  with the help of birdcalls. She presents them via instruments, made with by hand and with incredible creativity, in a kind of aviary, thus also adhering to the principle of granting a physical presence to the acoustic components of the exhibition. These objects, too, are architectures in Kinoshita’s understanding, since they form a dwelling place for sound. And this brings us back to the never-ending topic of change- ability: when Kinoshita deploys birdcalls, it is by no means to imitate them. Instead, it is about the creation of something new. Just as it is with every memory, every object, every word.

Kristina Scepanski,  introduction to the exhibition « Architektonische Psychodramen » Westfälischer Kunstverein, 2022.

Luxembourg Art Week, 2023, les images (1)

John Murphy, The Deceptive Caress of a Giraffe, 1993, oil on canvas, 264 x 168 cm
ohn Murphy
On the Way… Are you dressed in the map of your travels? 2003
Stuffed parrot, post card and stand. Parrot: 24 x 32 x 23 cm, stand: 83 x 73x 3,5 cm, framed postcard. 86,5 x 74,5 x 3,5 cm.
John Murphy, Words fall like stones, like corpses, 2015. Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board , 48 × 54 cm
Loïc Moons
Sans titre, 2023
Mixed media on canvas, 140 x 122 cm.
Loic Moons, Sans titre, 2023

Luxembourg Art Week, preview, John Murphy

John Murphy
The Deceptive Caress of a Giraffe, 1993
oil on canvas, 264 x 168 cm

La surface des peintures de John Murphy fait penser à une membrane, un rideau doux et translucide qui dissimule de grandes parties de ce qu’il couvre alors que des détails subtils nous parviennent d’un autre monde. Dans The Deceptive Caress of a Giraffe (1993), un ton orange indéterminé recouvre la grande toile tandis qu’en haut, à droite, les oreilles de deux girafes émergent. Un regard attentif permet de voir que les girafes s’enlacent dans une étreinte apparente de leurs deux cous Toutefois, le mouvement en soi n’est autre qu’une tentative de domination de l’une sur l’autre. La couleur est une superposition de fines couches « tachetées ». Sa densité semble transparente, presque immatérielle, ce qui fait que l’image fantomatique de la girafe suscite l’impression qu’elle flotte dans un espace indéfinissable. (Mélanie Deboutte)

John Murphy
On the Way… Are you dressed in the map of your travels?  2003
Stuffed parrot, post card and stand. Parrot: 24 x 32 x 23 cm, stand: 83 x 73x 3,5 cm, framed postcard: 
86,5 x 74,5 x 3,5 cm.

Le texte occupe une dimension cruciale dans l’ œuvre de Murphy Le titre est une entité autonome, physiquement séparée de l’œuvre – l’image, l’objet – et les deux coexistent sur un pied d’égalité. Les titres sont des extraits de textes existants, ils sont reconnaissables, mais difficiles à situer. Prenons On the Way. Are you dressed in the map of your travels ? (2003) le titre est aussi apposé en écriture manuscrite sur l’espace blanc qui entoure l’image encadrée, une carte postale trouvée représentant une mappemonde. Un perroquet empaillé, également un élément « recyclé », observe l’image à distance, figé dans le temps et l’espace. Comme souvent, le titre exprime un certain désir, un intérêt pour la sensualité, un penchant pour le toucher physique et mental. Chiens, girafes, un perroquet empaillé, les animaux apparaissent sous diverses formes dans son œuvre. Ils témoignent de l’intérêt que Murphy porte à la zoologie, outre l’inspiration qu’il puise dans la botanique, la cosmologie et l’histoire de l’ art.

John Murphy, History Tales. Fact and Fiction in History Painting, Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien, les images

John Murphy
The Joseph Conrad serie, 2003
Etching on offset and serigraphy (text), 85 x 101 cm. 

Dans The Joseph Conrad Series (2003), John Murphy reproduit 26 fois l’image d’un trois-mâts, chaque fois avec un titre différent. Il s’agit d’une photographie trouvée que l’artiste a récupérée. À partir de l’intérêt qu’il porte à la répétition, Murphy souhaite stimuler l’ œil du spectateur à chercher des similitudes et des différences, que seuls les titres contiennent. L’artiste ouvre à notre imaginaire un espace entre le mot, l’image et l’objet. Le bateau sur la photo porte le nom de Joseph Conrad, l’écrivain polonais-anglais connu pour ses récits de voyage qui se déroulent souvent en mer et s’articulent autour de valeurs morales et de solitude. Avec des titres comme E la nave va, Movement of the internai being et North of the future, John Murphy partage les sensibilités subtiles propres à son œuvre. Avec un raffinement froid, il crée une atmosphère mélancolique qui s’apparente à la saudade des chants de marins portugais. Le sentiment de manque est vague par essence et sa viscosité fait qu’il colle à l’âme. En même temps, le voyage promet de l’aventure, un déplacement dans le temps et dans l’espace et de nouveaux horizons. (Mélanie Deboutte)

John Murphy, History Tales. Fact and Fiction in History Painting, Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien

John Murphy, The Konrad Serie, Etching on offset and serigraphy, 85 x 101 cm,
2003

John Murphy participe à l’exposition History Tales. Fact and Fiction in History Painting à l’Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien 

In autumn 2023, the exhibition History Tales. Fact and Fiction in History Painting will focus on the representation of history with respect to narratives governing national identities. How is the rise and fall of civilizations presented historically? How has human hubris been allegorized in history paintings since the 17th century? And what have been the changes in depictions of myths, heroes and heroines, rulers male and female, and decisive historical events up to the present day – in the light of technological change and the invention of photography and film?

The exhibition examines the history painting with a view to the historical Art Collections – Paintings Gallery, Graphic Collection, Plaster Cast Collection – on the one hand and works by contemporary artists on the other. In so doing, it will shed light on the capacity of the history painting and its variations in the media age to oscillate iridescently between fact and fiction and its potential for focusing on historicity as an artistic theme in its own right.

Venue: Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, Paintings Gallery, Schillerplatz 3, 1010 Vienna.

27.9.2023–26.5.2024  Daily except Monday, 10–18 h

More information about the content of the exhibition can be found in the > Press Release pdf
 

John Murphy, Deep Deep Down, présentation de la collection, MUDAM, Luxembourg

John Murphy, A Clearer Conception of Vision, fig.1, fig.é, fig.3, fig.4, 1992 (photo : Remi Villaggi)

John Murphy participe à l’exposition Deep Deep Down, présentation de la collection, au MUDAM à Luxembourg. Commissaires : Shirana Shahbazi et Tirdad Zolghadr.

Soyons clairs : l’objectif n’est pas d’être critique. Ce qui est plus urgent, c’est d’essayer de transformer la collection en quelque chose que l’on peut saisir intellectuellement et physiquement. L’idée est de faire de cette invention étrange, spectaculaire, foisonnante et intimidante de la modernité européenne que nous appelons collection publique une expérience, quelque chose qui aille au-delà de l’inventaire ou du communiqué de presse.

Plus d’informations sur le site du musée. 

The Galleries Show IV, Antwerpen, les images

The galleries Show IV, Antwerpen
John MURPHY
The work of art is… A.J. J.M.
1977
John Murphy
The Joseph Conrad serie, 2003
Etching on offset and serigraphy (text),
85 x 101 cm. Ed. of 2.
The galleries Show IV, Antwerpen
Loïc Moons
Sans titre, 2023
Huile sur toile, 101 x 81 cm et 162 x 125 cm
Jacqueline Mesmaeker
Couloir, 2023
Technique mixte sur papier
Jacqueline Mesmaeker
Contours clandestins, 2022
crayon gris, feutres colorés,
crayons colorés sur papier
(9) x 29,7 x 21 cm

The galleries show IV, Antwerpen, John Murphy

John Murphy
Movement of the internal being (The Joseph Conrad serie), 2003
Etching on offset and serigraphy (text), 85 x 101 cm.  Ed. of 2.

Dans The Joseph Conrad Series (2003), John Murphy reproduit 26 fois l’image d’un trois-mâts, chaque fois avec un titre différent. Il s’agit d’une photographie trouvée que l’artiste a récupérée. À partir de l’intérêt qu’il porte à la répétition, Murphy souhaite stimuler l’ œil du spectateur à chercher des similitudes et des différences, que seuls les titres contiennent. L’artiste ouvre à notre imaginaire un espace entre le mot, l’image et l’objet. Le bateau sur la photo porte le nom de Joseph Conrad, l’écrivain polonais-anglais connu pour ses récits de voyage qui se déroulent souvent en mer et s’articulent autour de valeurs morales et de solitude. Avec des titres comme E la nave va, Movement of the internai being et North of the future, John Murphy partage les sensibilités subtiles propres à son œuvre. Avec un raffinement froid, il crée une atmosphère mélancolique qui s’apparente à la saudade des chants de marins portugais. Le sentiment de manque est vague par essence et sa viscosité fait qu’il colle à l’âme. En même temps, le voyage promet de l’aventure, un déplacement dans le temps et dans l’espace et de nouveaux horizons. (Mélanie Deboutte, dans le catalogue de l’exposition du musée Raveel)

John Murphy
Controlled Bleeding, 1993
Huile sur toile, 82 x 76 cm

John Murphy, Unreadiness, Raveelmuseum

John Murphy
…(Vella), 2002-2003
Oil on canvas, in two parts,  (2) x 230 x 169 x 3 cm

Les salles d’exposition du Musée Roger Raveel se composent d’une longue succession de pièces et de salles. Le visiteur peut découvrir les œuvres au cours d’une promenade à la fois physique et mentale. Une version miroir de l’exposition se révèle à la fin, étant donné que le visiteur doit revenir sur ses pas pour achever sa visite. Ce déplacement dans l’espace commence dans le hall d’entrée avec l’énigmatique (Vela) (2002-2003) de John Murphy, une toile d’un bleu de nuit profond. Le terme latin de vela dans le titre fait référence aux voiles d’un bateau. Une constellation illumine les heures sombres de la nuit, lorsque nos désirs et nos peurs se balancent au rythme de la mer. Notre regard suit la constellation du tableau qui, dès le début de l’exposition, nous propose une première énigme, une première halte dans le voyage.

Exhibition view

Le chien apparaît également dans les grands tableaux de Murphy, The Song of the Flesh or The Dog who Shits (Lyra) (1993), A Different Constellation (Lupus) (1994) et The Invention of the Other (Vulpecula) (1994). Sur chaque toile, on aperçoit un chien, l’un détourne le regard, un autre dort et un troisième défèque. Simplifiés en dessins au trait et isolés dans un plan de l’image de couleur brun pâle, les chiens semblent ignorer aussi bien les constellations qui se profilent au-dessus d’eux à une distance incommensurable que le spectateur qui les rencontre dans la salle du musée. Les chiens peuvent être considérés comme des métaphores de l’être humain qui, même dans une quête fébrile de réponses, est et reste lié à son propre corps et à une pulsion de (sur)vie.

John Murphy
The invention of rthe other (Vulpecula), 1994
Oil on linen, 264 x 198,5 cm
John Murphy 
The Song of the Flesh or The Dog who Shits (Lyra), 1993
oil on canvas, 264 x 198 cm
John Murphy
On the Way… Are you dressed in the map of your travels?  2003
Stuffed parrot, post card and stand. Parrot: 24 x 32 x 23 cm, stand: 83 x 73x 3,5 cm, framed postcard: 
86,5 x 74,5 x 3,5 cm.

Le texte occupe une dimension cruciale dans l’ œuvre de Murphy Le titre est une entité autonome, physiquement séparée de l’œuvre – l’image, l’objet – et les deux coexistent sur un pied d’égalité. Les titres sont des extraits de textes existants, ils sont reconnaissables, mais difficiles à situer. Prenons On the Way. Are you dressed in the map of your travels ? (2003) le titre est aussi apposé en écriture manuscrite sur l’espace blanc qui entoure l’image encadrée, une carte postale trouvée représentant une mappemonde. Un perroquet empaillé, également un élément « recyclé », observe l’image à distance, figé dans le temps et l’espace. Comme souvent, le titre exprime un certain désir, un intérêt pour la sensualité, un penchant pour le toucher physique et mental. Chiens, girafes, un perroquet empaillé, les animaux apparaissent sous diverses formes dans son œuvre. Ils témoignent de l’intérêt que Murphy porte à la zoologie, outre l’inspiration qu’il puise dans la botanique, la cosmologie et l’histoire de l’ art.

John Murphy
The Deceptive Caress of a Giraffe, 1993
oil on canvas, 264 x 168 cm
Exhibition view

Lorsque notre mémoire est activée, une expérience synesthésique se produit. Une odeur ou un son, certaines images ou des lieux spécifiques nous rappellent certaines expériences ou certains sentiments. Cette sensation nous envahit aussi quand on contemple les œuvres de John Murphy, en particulier ses peintures. Parfois, de grandes parties de la toile sont quasi entièrement monochromes, comme Nothing. Wait and See (1990-1991). La texture particulière de ce tableau lui confère un effet de voile. On regarde la couleur, la « peau » du tableau, et on prend conscience de l’insignifiance de son vide. Simultanément, nos pensées commencent à relier la couleur au bleu du ciel, à une douce journée printanière, aux fleurs qui éclosent dans le champ à côté de la maison où on a grandi. L’imagination et les souvenirs du spectateur complètent l’existence autonome du tableau sous nos yeux. La perception n’est pas uniquement actionnée par la tête, mais par le ventre et le cœur aussi. Cette expérience hautement intime gravite autour d’une réalité tangible mais énigmatique que l’on ne peut qu’entrevoir.

La surface des peintures de John Murphy fait penser à une membrane, un rideau doux et translucide qui dissimule de grandes parties de ce qu’il couvre alors que des détails subtils nous parviennent d’un autre monde. Dans The Deceptive Caress of a Giraffe (1993), un ton orange indéterminé recouvre la grande toile tandis qu’en haut, à droite, les oreilles de deux girafes émergent. Un regard attentif permet de voir que les girafes s’enlacent dans une étreinte apparente de leurs deux cous Toutefois, le mouvement en soi n’est autre qu’une tentative de domination de l’une sur l’autre. La couleur est une superposition de fines couches « tachetées ». Sa densité semble transparente, presque immatérielle, ce qui fait que l’image fantomatique de la girafe suscite l’impression qu’elle flotte dans un espace indéfinissable. (Mélanie Deboutte, dans le catalogue de l’exposition)

Exhibition view
John Murphy
Movement of the internal being (The Joseph Conrad serie), 2003
Etching on offset and serigraphy (text), 85 x 101 cm.  Ed. of 2.

Dans The Joseph Conrad Series (2003), John Murphy reproduit 26 fois l’image d’un trois-mâts, chaque fois avec un titre différent. Il s’agit d’une photographie trouvée que l’artiste a récupérée. À partir de l’intérêt qu’il porte à la répétition, Murphy souhaite stimuler l’ œil du spectateur à chercher des similitudes et des différences, que seuls les titres contiennent. L’artiste ouvre à notre imaginaire un espace entre le mot, l’image et l’objet. Le bateau sur la photo porte le nom de Joseph Conrad, l’écrivain polonais-anglais connu pour ses récits de voyage qui se déroulent souvent en mer et s’articulent autour de valeurs morales et de solitude. Avec des titres comme E la nave va, Movement of the internai being et North of the future, John Murphy partage les sensibilités subtiles propres à son œuvre. Avec un raffinement froid, il crée une atmosphère mélancolique qui s’apparente à la saudade des chants de marins portugais. Le sentiment de manque est vague par essence et sa viscosité fait qu’il colle à l’âme. En même temps, le voyage promet de l’aventure, un déplacement dans le temps et dans l’espace et de nouveaux horizons. (Mélanie Deboutte, dans le catalogue de l’exposition)

John Murphy
The Tiepolo’s Serie. In their own dark, 2015 The Tiepolo’s Serie
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm

Dans Tiepolo Series (2015), Murphy se concentre sur Pulcinella, un personnage de la commedia dell’arte. Figure mystérieuse et pleine de contradictions, Pulcinella traverse la vie en tant qu’homrne ou femme, masqué, avec une bosse et un nez crochu. L’ample costume blanc et le chapeau conique sont les vêtements typiques d’un personnage rusé, rustre et ambigu, parfois voleur et rebelle, mais qui combat toujours les catastrophes et intervient comme le sauveur d’autres personnages. Murphy s’inspire d’une fascinante série de dessins et de fresques du XVIIIe siècle, du peintre Giandomenico Tiepolo, fils du célèbre Giambattista Tiepolo. Dans cette série, Pulcinella apparaît dans diverses scènes dans lesquelles il fait des farces à grands coups de gestes et de grimaces grotesques. Fait remarquable, dans chaque scène, plusieurs personnages jouent le rôle de Pulcinella, comme autant de clones de lui-même. Murphy isole le protagoniste des autres personnages, les retire du spectacle très animé et les transfère sur un panneau blanc à la faveur d’un stylo et de gouache. La série qui en résulte se compose de regroupements absurdes du personnage démultiplié. Ici et là, Murphy reprend aussi les chiens qui suivent la scène extravagante en tant que spectateurs

John Murphy
The Tiepolo’s Serie. Words fall like stones, like corpses, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm
John Murphy
The Tiepolo’s Serie. For the eyes of dogs to come, 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm
John Murphy
The Tiepolo’s Serie. The Discipline of Uncertainty. 2015
Photocopy, gouache, pen and ink on board, 46 x 54 cm
John Murphy,
India Song:  . . . /Anne-Marie Stretter  1991-92 / 2021.
Huile sur lin, 228 x 128 cm

John Murphy déclare dans une interview en 1979 « J’aspire à créer du sens dans l’espace entre les mots et l’image, sans en même temps spécifier le sens [ .. ] le sujet s’apaise quelque part en dehors des simples faits établis d’une œuvre d’art ». L‘expérience humaine est au cœur de l’ œuvre, qui est à la fois très personnelle, mais revêt aussi une dimension universelle et intemporelle. Murphy, qui peint exclusivement à la lumière du jour, invoque la richesse inépuisable des couleurs. « La couleur devient une voix, un son que nos yeux entendent», écrit Barry Barker. L’artiste transforme,  il transpose la couleur en lumière voilée. La lumière de l’espace qui abrite l’œuvre suscite les nuances raffinées de la couleur. L’attention du spectateur s’aiguise, les sens sont stimulés. L’ expérience de perception visuelle prend le dessus sur la recherche d’un récit ou d’un sens. Un certain détachement règne sur les tableaux grâce à un maniement précis et contrôlé du pinceau. Les simples motifs linéaires flottent comme des « nomades magiques » dans le plan indéfini de l’image et contribuent au mystère dans lequel le spectateur peut se perdre. (Mélanie Deboutte, dans le catalogue de l’exposition)

Exhibition view
Exhibition view